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Editorial

V&A Illustration Awards 2013: Published Category - Editorial Illustration (Newspaper, Magazine and Comic)

Nick Lowndes ‘Mastering Growth’ in Financial Times. Editorial winner 2012.

Supported by the Enid Linder Foundation

Editorial Award Winner
Nick Lowndes illustration to ‘Mastering Growth’ in Financial Times

Published by FT Group, 1 July 2011

Nick Lowndes holds a degree in Illustration and Animation from the University of Manchester and has worked as a freelance illustrator for fourteen years. His conceptual work displays a bold, iconic and graphic style and he has an array of influences including Picasso, Patrick Caulfield, Andre Francois, Matisse and Jean-Michel Basquiat. He is represented by Eastwing illustration agency and has worked for a variety of UK and US clients including The Financial Times, The Guardian, The Economist, Adobe and Barclays.

Lowndes’ winning illustration was for part three of a Financial Times special report on small and medium enterprises, called ‘Mastering Growth' about which he says, ‘I wanted to create a bold, graphic image based on a strong idea, so the illustration focuses on a small enterprise aspiring to grow and survive in the daunting world of business. The final artwork was produced digitally using a combination of Photoshop and Illustrator.’

The judges all agreed that this image delivered the story in a concise yet eye-catching way. Orla Kiely said, ‘This design is creative but clearly illustrates the article. Simple and cleverly designed. A strong idea.’ Moira Gemmill found the work, ‘Simple, punchy and to the point. Gets the message across in an instant.’

Nick Lowndes website: www.eastwing.co.uk/artist/nicklowndes


Editorial Shortlisted Entrants

Luke Best, Chivalric Fiasco (Harper’s Magazine)
‘I like the stylised flat perspective of this illustration and the colour is good.’ - Orla Kiely.

Stefano Morri, Henry’s Demons (BBC Radio Times)
‘A strong way of illustrating such a moving story. The message is very powerful.’ - Orla Kiely.