Monthly Archives: October 2009

2005 · 2006 · 2007 · 2008 · 2009 · 2010 · 2011 · 2012 · 2013 · 2014
January · February · March · April · May · June · July · August · September · October · November · December

Back to the blog front page

Pink Champagne and Violet Creams…

Sometimes you need to get out of the office – away from the nuts and bolts of exhibition planning. You need to gain some perspective, remember not to take things too personally, keep the vision (and the faith). You need to remind yourself that there is a world beyond the confines of your desk and computer; leaving for work in the dark and going home in the dark can narrow your field of vision, you become blinkered. You suddenly crave adventure. I decided to hop on a train and visit the American Museum in Britain, Bath. I've been so focused …

Keep reading

Lunchtime workshops

This week I’m running lunchtime workshops, demonstrating figure and animal modelling to schoolchildren during half-term week. The children are enthralled, and enjoy choosing which animals I should put together from the modelled parts. I am shocked at how many parents say that their children don’t get the chance to handle clay at primary school. The plaster casting of Janus is finished and the mould ‘broken’ open to allow the individual pieces to dry out ready for pressing next week.

Keep reading

One for the Boys…

I'm in trouble … again. It was a simple enough comment; I described Quilts 1700-2010 as an exhibition by women, for women. Of course I don't mean to be exclusive but I don't think it's much to ask, one little exhibition which celebrates the feminine. I've just re-read Richard Dorment's top five exhibitions for 2009 – Baroque (Bernini, Borromini, Tiepolo); Futurism (Boccioni, Severini, Carra and Balla); Palladio;Van Dyke; and Constable. I might be wrong but aren't these all blokes? Anyway enough of my feeble feminist ranting… here is a story for the boys. One of the joys of working on …

Keep reading

Janus clay model now finished

The clay model of Janus is now finished and ready for casting. I have decided to make a rather complex, 22-piece mould, in order to try to emulate the fragmented and collaged qualities in some new drawings. The plan is to press-mould, fire, glaze and decorate each section separately, and cement the sections together once complete. I think this will work, provided the pieces don’t go too out of shape in the firing. I’m a little nervous of making messy plaster moulds in this pristine new studio, particularly as I’m on show through the glass wall the whole time.

Keep reading

X Ray Specs

A small show currently on view in the V&A's Architecture Galleries, Europe and English Baroque:English Architecture 1660-1715, got me thinking about cross-sections in design drawings. The display features works by Christopher Wren and other architects of his era. (Those who saw the excellent exhibition Compass and Rule at the Museum of the History of Science, Oxford will see some familiar names – that show will open at the Yale Center for British Art soon.) There are two especially striking examples of cross-sections in the V&A show. First, Christopher Wren's sketches for the dome of St. Paul's Cathedral.On the left is …

Keep reading

Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness

I love this time of year – I've been fortunate enough during my career to travel widely to exotic climes. Over the past two years I have spoken at conferences in Sydney and Honolulu and have missed the onset of autumn. Last week I travelled to York to attend the opening of Japanese Sashiko Textiles at York Art Gallery. I looked forward to spending two hours on the train revisiting Mavis Fitzrandolph's book 'Traditional Quilting'. Within 20 minutes of leaving London, however,I was engrossed in staring out of the window watching the pasting scenery – the glorious sight of the …

Keep reading

St Thérèse of Lisieux

By Stuart Frost Earlier this week relics of Saint Thérèse of Lisieux arrived at Westminster Cathedral in London as the culmination of a month long tour of Britain. The reaction from the public and the media has been remarkable. The relics of this French nun, who died in 1897 at the age of  twenty-four, have drawn […]

Keep reading

Volunteeers Wanted!

This week I was going to share with you my meditations on my journey to York to see Japanese Sashiko Textiles however our design team have asked me to put outa call for volunteers. Ever mindful of the needs of our audience we would likethree volunteers to join us at the V&A for a Focus Group session to test the prototypes for ourlabels and graphic panels for theexhibition. For very practical reasons you will needto live within the Greater London area andbe able to travel to South Kensington. We will imburse reasonable travel expenses. The date set for for the …

Keep reading

Origin

This is the Crafts Council craft event, two weeks of delicious things exhibited in a pavilion in the courtyard of Somerset House so surrounded by fine building of a serious nature. Inside are stalls, shops, booths – describe them as you wish, but each has an individual craftsperson displaying their finest products and willing to talk and show and, of course, sell to you or negotiate a commission. It is a treat and an eye-opener and this year is a good one. The layout is a little different and gives a greater sense of space, and I think they may …

Keep reading

London Design Festival

This, a couple of weeks ago, happened in the Sackler Centre of the V & A as well as all over London. What a happening! Outside the Studios was a constant crowd of exhibition watchers, those going to talks and seminars, having coffees and generally transforming the building with action in the classroom downstairs, the […]

Keep reading