Monthly Archives: January 2010

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What’s in your fabric stash…

I was sorting mine out last week in preparation for a photo shoot (at home with the Prichards – complete with husband making like Keith Floyd, whisk in one hand, glass of red in the other).As I looked at the scattered fabrics across the floor, my past flashed before my eyes.The spriggy Laura Ashley prints (my 18th birthday party dress), the deckchair stripes (a beach skirt I made for my first back packing holiday to Greece), the black and white polka dot (a gorgeous dress, which made me feel like a Vogue model, complete with signature red lipstick).I still remember …

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Two Heads

Finished modelling the second (Chinese) head and made a plaster mould of this one and the Pandora head. Both are rather straight ‘copies’, though simplified, and are merely the first stage towards the deconstructed hybrid heads. As usual, the plaster casting takes longer than I’d imagined, and combined with a day on the Frankenstein project my three days in London are soon swallowed up. I’m feeling that time is slipping away, only four weeks left in residency here! Time to adopt a strategic approach, and focus on gathering the information I need from archives, stores and collections while I still …

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A Work in Progress: The Design and Printing of Eighteenth-Century Trade Cards

This post has been contributed by special guest star Dr. Philippa Hubbard, Institute of Advanced Study, University of Warwick. This endearing pen and ink sketch, from around 1770, of drawing-master Thomas Johnson is a draft design for Johnson’s advertising trade card. Trade cards were typically single-sheet engraved or etched prints that combined text and image to promote the goods or services for a wide variety of individual tradesmen and shopkeepers. These black and white images were popular in Britain from the middle of the seventeenth century until the first quarter of the nineteenth century, when intaglio engraving techniques were superseded …

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Week 3 | Wish you were here: 25.01.10

“Expect Hollywood spotlights next time, so wear something nice!” Open Sesame Where were you on Wednesday afternoon? You missed the open studio. We cooked, we cleaned, we decorated the walls… It turns out an open studio day is a bit like taking part in ‘Come Dine With Me’. We slave away on our MacBook Pros and behave like the perfect hosts whilst our guests snoop around in our drawers, critique our interior design, badmouth our family photographs and examine our architectural…err…briefs. Then we are scored on our hospitality afterwards. We intended to serve beer and wine in the studio, but …

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Vazio S/A – Spiral Booths visualisation

In December, we discussed with Carlos Teixeira how to rationalise and simplify the spatial arrangement of the performance booths in his structure, 'Spiral Booths' (based on the voids found amongst the concrete stilts of suspended Brazilian palafitte buildings). We received a link from Carlos this morning for a 3-D visualisation for the new design – something that will be very useful for our technical consultants on the project (they are essential to the exhibition – crucial structural engineering and building advice!) http://vimeo.com/11994858 It's actually quite fascinating to see exactly how all these booths fit together, something that is quite hard …

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Calculating Calculus

I thought this might be a good point to share a few hands on images. In the making of Calculus hundreds and thousands of decisions were wrestled and questioned in researching, collecting, sorting, selecting, organising, ordering, laying out, composing…

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Frankenstein Project

Continued with the Frankenstein project inviting the visitors to my usual Thursday open studio day. Not everyone chose to participate but enough did to keep me busy running between camera, computer, printer and light-box, and they have produced some fantastic drawings and Frankenstein collages. I’ve begun the second modelled head, this one based on a cast iron sculpture of a Chinese Buddhist monk, with the most amazing ears! Also been on the look-out for more vessel-forms to add to the growing alphabet of ceramic skeuomorphs, and I’ve found an interesting pair of early medieval two-toed socks from a burial at …

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