Monthly Archives: July 2010

2005 · 2006 · 2007 · 2008 · 2009 · 2010 · 2011 · 2012 · 2013 · 2014
January · February · March · April · May · June · July · August · September · October · November · December

Back to the blog front page

Hidden worlds

Last weekI had the chance to see more of the work that happens behind the scenes at the museum, including the technical workshops and conservation department. I had never thought much before about the hidden structures that exist between the building and the objects. In the workshops, mounts were being made for pieces of jewellery which looked like intricate shadows of the objects themselves. Visiting the conservation department mademe see objectsin the museum more like living organisms, with humidity, temperature and light controlled in their environments. Their materials expanding, contracting, producing gases and disintegrating. The time and care that is …

Keep reading

1000

World Beach Project hits the 1000 mark! Fantastic! I feel so proud. (I’m never quite sure why pride is considered to be such a sin… just bubbling up, unbidden, as it does.) I think I can safely say it is shared by everyone at the V&A who is involved in the project and I hope equally by all who have taken part to date. Let us celebrate a truly collective pride in the achievement built together… and in an idea which continues to grow and develop.

Keep reading

Beside the Seaside

My father was from Hunmanby in the East Riding of Yorkshire and summer holidays as a young child were spent on the stretch of coast from Bridlington to Scarborough. We got there by steam train and double decker bus (dome roofed, dark blue). Sand in castles and sandwiches, donkey rides, rock pools, knickerbocker glories, prickly coconut mats on the helter-skelter, Filey Brigg and steep iron ladders up the cliff face. Good stuff. As submissions to World Beach fast approached the 1000 mark, I recently enjoyed one of the best education days ever on the beach at Filey.

Keep reading

An Empty Space

First chance to look around the exhibition space – empty. The last few displays from the previous show Quilts are being removed. That has been a huge success, so our show has a lot to live up to. We have been given all three galleries, about 1,300 m2 – completely empty, they look huge. However, once cases and partitions go in the space will shrink dramatically – and, of course, we hope it will be full of visitors as well! The V&A keeps galleries shut for as little time as possible so the “turn around” period is just seven weeks. …

Keep reading

Beginnings

Being based on the sixth floor has the advantage of having to walk through the whole museum as I come and go from the studio. I have already developed favourite routes and an ever growing list of favourite objects I pass each day. It feels quite magical to be given a key to this vast building and the possibilityto spend time exploringthe collections in depth. A highlight of the first few weeks has been a trip to the museum store at Blythe House. Reino Liefkes (Senior Curator Ceramics & Glass Collection) showed meimages ofa collection of fragments from a Meissen …

Keep reading

Introducing the team

Only two months to the opening of Diaghilev and the Golden Age of the Ballets Russes 1909-1929 – the V&A’s special exhibition for Autumn 2010 – so started my blog. Hope to give you an insight into the run up to a major exhibition here, and an idea of some of the challenges we face. And of course we hope you will want to come to the show itself! It’s a rare opportunity and it’s unlikely that many of the exhibits will be seen again here for many years. But first the team. I’ve been the V&A’s Curator of dance …

Keep reading

The Role of the Catalogue

You may be wondering why this post is accompanied by a photo of a party. Where is the art, you say? What does this have to do with the Medieval and Renaissance periods? Have I stumbled on someone’s Facebook page? Well, I thought you might like to see one of the less obvious results of […]

Keep reading

Trail of Tears

I'm just back from a trip to Madrid, a first for me on many fronts: first time in the city, first time I've seen a country celebrating a World Cup victory (the game happened while I was there), first time to the Prado to see what is probably my favorite painting, Velazsquez's Las Meninas. It was also my first time to visit the Reina Sofia, Madrid's impressive museum for modern art, and hence to see their prize possession – Picasso's Guernica. This is a big month for Picasso in the UK, with a major show at Gagosian here in London …

Keep reading

Week 25 | The End Has No End:

“One thing we will really miss about the architecture residency is the Friday afternoon tea and cakes…” Monday The beginning of the end of our V&A architecture residency started at Paddington railway station with a V&A film team trailing our 30-minute train ride to Langley Grammar School. We were travelling west to see how our school group had finished their stage set models. When we arrived, each group took it in turns to present their schemes for redesigning the school cafeteria. In a surreal twist, one group presented their entire scheme using voices from the TV show ‘fonejacker’. The gleeful …

Keep reading

And now the end is near, its time to face the final curtain…

Actually I had high hopes for this my final blog. I rang the 'IT Crowd' with the suggestion that they could do something wizzy and overlay this entry with Ole' Blue Eyes singing 'My Way'. However, we got involved in a long discussion about copyright and I started to lose the will to live. However you get the gist – I am yesterday's woman, I've had my 15 minutes of fame, I am about to be put out to grass. I said my final goodbye to Quilts 1700-2010 with atour for the agedmother (a cross between Mrs Malaprop and Count …

Keep reading