The tapestries woven at the Gobelins were the finest of any produced in Europe during the 17th and 18th centuries. This example, produced before Boucher was appointed head of the Manufactory, clearly demonstrates the quality and skill of Gobelin workers. V&A T.54-1955

New Season of V&A/IHR Early Modern Material Cultures Seminars

Want to know more about 18th-century shipwrecks? Or the magnificent gifts exchanged between Siam and Louis XIV? Are you intrigued by the sound of Doctor Dildo’s ‘Dauncing Schoole’? (Is it possible not to be intrigued by the sound of Doctor Dildo’s ‘Dauncing Schoole’?) These questions and many, many more will be answered by the V&A/IHR […]

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Guest Post: ‘Same but different’: Lehnga for every woman!

  In a previous blog we visited a designer wedding show to take a glimpse at the luxury end of the wedding market. This week we have a very different perspective from our guest blogger Sucharita Beniwal. It has to be done today, the whole family including mother, father, aunts, sister with her children, and […]

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Time capsules, finding the unexpected in buildings and objects. Part 2

The secret parcel and other discoveries from the Weston Cast Court. In my previous post I described some of the surprising items we found in the museum’s Medieval & Renaissance and British Sculpture galleries. The things that we found were type of messages from the past left by the people who worked in the museum […]

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The Early Music Movement and the V&A

In Britain the adoption of period instruments and historically informed practices (HIP) for the performance of ‘early music’ (generally understood to encompass music of the Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods) dates to the 1970s, with some ensembles, such as the Deller Consort, blazing a trail earlier still. Looking through the concert files in the V&A […]

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The Tower of Babel – Shop of the Day No.32

The Tower of Babel – Shop of the Day No.32′ ‘Who’ would have thought it – a Dr.Who shop in West Ham! Love niche shops.   ©Barnaby Barford 2014

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Mini-Museum of Cardboard Curiosities

Over the past months a small museum of sorts has developed on the shelf behind my desk. The objects can’t really be described as examples of incredible craftsmanship, but they have proven to be extremely valuable in developing our displays. Nestled alongside my glamorous helmet and safety boots (needed for visiting the galleries whilst under-construction) are […]

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Items from the collection, l-r: gold disc, commemorative lp, contact sheet, AAA pass & grain sack

Band Aid Trust Collection – a new Theatre and Performance acquisition

I remember bobbing heads, more heads than I’d ever seen in one place.  I remember a man on stage; an angry man.  He had a lot of hair and was shouting at the heads.  They didn’t look scared…they looked like they were having a good time. This is how I recall the experience of watching the London […]

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The Tower of Babel – Shop of the Day No.31

The Tower of Babel – Shop of the Day No.31 Kosher wine shop in Golders Green NW11 but who could the cardboard cutout be of in the top right window????   ©Barnaby Barford 2014

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The Tower of Babel – Shop of the Day No.31

The Tower of Babel – Shop of the Day No.31 We’ve been languishing nearer the base of the Tower for a while now so I think it’s time for another trip up west and up to the top of The Tower. In celebration of the much lauded Savage Beauty exhibition let’s go to Sloane St […]

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This diagram shows how the different archive levels fit together to form the tree.

Structuring the Peter Brook Collection archive tree

Deciding how to structure archives can be quite a challenge. Unlike library and museum cataloguing which deals with individual items, archive cataloguing look at multiple items in relation to each other. It has different levels and they are arranged from general to specific. The lower levels relate to upper levels like a family tree. The […]

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