Tag: 1930s

Back to the blog front page

The Guard Book Project – A Glimpse Into the Past

Central View of The Octagon Court ; with room sets displays;

The Museum as it Was, 1929 – 1950. Take a look at this interior from 1936, and where do you think it is?.. …no, it`s not the main entrance, this is Gallery 40, without the Mezzanine floor, and not a costume in site. It was known at the time as The Octagon Court, Furniture Displays Gallery, each […]

Keep reading

The Guard Book Project – A Resource for Research

Portrait miniatures submitted for appraisal in 1939.

Well… I never knew that….. This digitisation project is providing a unique opportunity for various areas of research about the museums collections, the history of the building, exhibitions, activities, and items that were here for a short period of time for displays, or appraisals, and those that left the building never to be seen again, with examples in this blog, of […]

Keep reading

The Guard Book Project

Portrait of a female by Raphael, pencil drawing, said to be the model for his Madonnas

This project is the digitisation of The Guard Book Archive of Black & White Photographs taken by the Museum between 1856 – 1997. First of all what is a Guard Book?, other terms could be, an Album, Store Book, Scrapbook, Folder, Guard Box, the list could go on, but one word is important, the word Guard, to […]

Keep reading

Out On Display #8: a subversive love-letter

            Evening dress  Charles James France (Paris), printed silk, 1938 T.274-1974 On display in room 40     At first glance, the playful print on this vivid evening gown is merely a collection of disembodied faces, tumbling over the fabric in the Surrealist style so popular in 1930s couture. In […]

Keep reading

The One About the Red Wedding Dress

If you have somehow got away with not hearing the one about the red wedding dress yet, please give my interview with the Decorators a listen. listen to ‘V&A RadioTour #3: The Red Wedding Dress’ on Audioboo On the same site, you can also listen to interviews with five other members of staff, be they a […]

Keep reading

June Brides

When researching this exhibition, we did a survey of which months were the most popular for weddings among our selection of dresses and the nearly 240 years they cover. While July proved the most popular month, with nine weddings and one date on which two weddings were held, the only other double up of dates […]

Keep reading

From airbrush to felt-tip

It’s unusual for a historian to have the opportunity to look at the complete working methods of a design office. Sketches and models are often thrown away once a project is brought to completion. Before coming to the V&A, I had the chance to write about a design firm that did keep a great deal of its preparatory studies. This was the office of Brooks Stevens, an industrial designer based in Milwaukee. For an exhibition at the Milwaukee Art Museum I studied renderings, surviving models, and photos that documented the working procedures of the firm. The first thing you notice …

Keep reading