Tag: Asia

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Japanese print by Shigenobu (Hiroshige II) depicting Nakano Street in the Yoshiwara district of Edo (Tokyo) during cherry blossom season.

Toshiba Gallery – From Renovation to Innovation

The Japanese concept of ‘mono no aware’ is central to Japanese aesthetics. It is usually translated as ‘the pathos of things’ and is used to describe the beauty of the ephemeral. The cherry blossom, which blooms for only a few weeks, is highly valued in Japan because of its transience. It is fitting that as […]

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New display at the Korean Gallery

Contemporary Korean Ceramics: Tradition and Innovation

  In Korea, contemporary ceramic art practice can be roughly divided into three different approaches. First of all, there are artists who adhere to tradition, preserving the cultural heritage of the nation. Secondly there are those who pursue innovation, seeking artistic originality and individual expression. The third trend bridges these two by reinterpreting tradition with […]

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Postcard Teas, London. Courtesy of Postcard Teas

1660 LONDON Tea Cup Connoisseur Set: Visit to Postcard Teas

Early in December, Jana and I went on a curatorial research trip to Postcard Teas, on Dering Street in London’s Mayfair district. It was a cold, drizzly afternoon and the shop became the perfect oasis away from the noisy crowds and ceaseless hustle of nearby Oxford Street. It occupies a small space and has a […]

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Sketch of Tipu’s tent by Designer, Gitta Gschwendtner

Size matters: Putting on an exhibition

Now we have an object list, the preparation of The Fabric of India exhibition can really get under way. One of the first things I need to organise is the assembly of key object information to be shared with the project team. The V&A project team is made of representatives from different departments across the […]

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The Festival of Holi

The Hindu festival of Holi falls in February and March, depending on the lunar calendar, heralding the arrival of Spring.  In 2014 Holi is celebrated on the 17th March.  The day is infused with a chaotic and joyous atmosphere during which participants throw brightly coloured powders and liquids at each other, and spray coloured water […]

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Latest acquisition funded by Samsung for the Korean Collection at the V&A: Aggregation10-SE032RED

We are delighted to announce that the V&A has a new addition to its growing Korean Collection. Aggregation10-SE032RED is part of a series of new acquisitions purchased in the last year with the generous support of Samsung. This large contemporary ‘relief-painting’ is made by the artist Chun Kwang-Young, renowned for his creative and innovative use […]

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Company painting_Delhi

Changing Displays at the Nehru Gallery: Conservation of Company Paintings at the V&A

This September, the V&A’s Nehru gallery of South Asian art will be transformed when the current display in the gallery is changed and around 85 new paintings and 20 textiles are installed. The V&A’s collections of South Asian art are the most comprehensive and important in the Western world. The paintings in the collection number some 5000, most of […]

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New Acquisition: A Painting of the Jain Pilgrimage Site at Shatrunjaya Hill

The V&A has recently acquired a large and splendid painting of Shatrunjaya Hill in Gujarat, one of the holiest Jain sites. Thousands of pilgrims climb up to the temples on top of the hills by a path with over 3,000 steps. Today (28 November 2012) is Kartik Purnima, the special day when these paintings are hung up and venerated in Jain temples. Detailed paintings of the sacred site, like this one, enable worshippers who are unable to be there to envisage and contemplate it.

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The 12 zodiac animals at the V&A

This year Chinese New Year Day falls on 3rd February. Celebrations usually go on a little longer. In ancient China the finale of festival activities was a splendid display of brightly lit lanterns on the 15th day, after sunset. The coming new year will be the Year of the Rabbit (some say ‘Hare’). Before 1912 the Chinese reckoning of the passage of time was not linear, but cyclical. The Chinese people did not call one year 1001, the following year 1002, and so on. The reckoning of any given year consisted of two parts – the heavenly stem (thereare ten) …

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Political or inspirational

The imperial robes arrived in London on 19th November. When they came out of the crates every member of the installation team was stunned by their beauty. This was not the first time I saw them in the flesh, but each piece still filled me with profound admiration. The skill of the Chinese weavers and embroiderers was out of this world. One has to see them to believe that such craftsmanship was possible Packing at the Palace Museum and installation at the V&A Journalists have expressed a great deal of interest in the way the robes were preserved. The garments …

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