Tag: ceramics

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Plate
Made in Staffordshire, about 1810-1820
	Mark: imitation of a Chinese emblem, printed in blue
Lead-glazed earthenware
55-1870

‘Here be Dragons’

This is one of the most striking pieces of ceramics that will be in the forthcoming V&A display Blue and White: British Printed Ceramics   The dragon on this earthenware soup plate appears to be swirling in the air ferociously grasping a flaming shell-like object in its claws. It is highly unlikely the decorator of this object […]

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Tray of Jasper Trials, 1773

Art Fund – Wedgwood Collection saved

Today the Art Fund announced that they have managed to raise the full £15.75m needed to save the Wedgwood Collection, 2 months ahead of their target, making this the fastest fundraising campaign in the Art Fund’s 111 year history. Launched on the 1st September with £13m already secured, the Art Fund turned to the public […]

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Barlaston shape teapot and cover in 'Summer Sky' pattern, 1955;

Art Fund appeal: Save the Wedgwood Collection

  The Art Fund are currently running an appeal to save the Wedgwood Collection from being separated and sold off. They have until the 30 November to raise the £15.75 m needed to ensure that one of the most significant industrial archives, consisting of over 80,000 objects and spanning over 250 years of history, remains […]

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Aiko Takamori vase

Out On Display #4: Akio Takamori and ‘Queer Objects’

Vase Akio Takamori USA, glazed stoneware, 1985 C.59-1986 On display in room 142   The contemporary Japanese-American ceramicist Akio Takamori creates pieces which draw upon traditional Japanese forms to represent the human body in a variety of whimsical and unsettling positions. This vase, in the shape of a flattened oval, represents two nude women embracing […]

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LDF 1

London Design Festival at the V&A

Halfway through the Festival week, I finally have time to sit down at my computer to write this post. The London Design Festival is the main focus of my job – I work on everything from the installations and displays to the huge events programme, press, parties, and everything in between. The London Design Festival […]

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Satirical print, seven men standing in front of the window of Darly's print shop looking at his caricature publications in the window. 14 July 1772 Etching

© The Trustees of the British Museum

Back to School

Continuing preparation for the forthcoming V&A display Blue and White: British Printed Ceramics I went back to school last week, well a ceramics summer school at Ellesmere College in Shropshire. The Northern Ceramic Society generously sponsored a bursary for me to attend as this year the programme was particularly relevant; ‘The Curious Art': Printing on […]

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© James Rigler

Sneak Peek at James Rigler’s LDF Display

It’s almost time for our Artists in Residence to begin installing their displays for London Design Festival and we have a familiar face reutrning who has offered us this intriguing sneak preview. James Rigler, a previous Ceramics Resident, is installing mysterious looking objects inside of the cast of Trajan’s Column in the Cast Courts. What needs […]

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© Nao Matsunaga.

Sneak Peek at Nao’s LDF Display

With London Design Festival just around the corner our Artists in Residence have been busy creating their displays. While they have been keeping things quite secretive I managed to get a few sneaky photos of what Nao Mastunaga, our Ceramics Resident, has been working on. Can you figure out what he has made? How big […]

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'After Willow' designed by Robert Dawson for Wedgwood, 2005 (V&A C.300-2009) Given by Josiah Wedgwood and Sons

Beyond Willow

The ‘Willow’ pattern is one of the most famous British ceramic designs. The scene of a temple with bridge, boat and willow tree was inspired by images found on Chinese ceramics, but was the creation of British manufacturers in the late-18th century. The love story it supposedly depicts was invented later as a clever marketing […]

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706-1890, gilt leather altar frontal showing SS. Roch (L) and Sebastian (R), © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

St. Roch

Many saints’ lives are dull affairs full of praying and fasting, proselytising and general do-gooding. St. Roch’s vita has all of these elements plus a good amount of gruesomeness, mysticism, and a faithful animal friend. Born near Montpellier around 1295, his chest was miraculously marked from birth with the sign of the cross. The infant […]

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