Tag: conservation

Back to the blog front page

Dress, designed by Madeline Vionnet, 1937. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Conservation of a Vionnet Dress

This beautiful dress was designed by Madeline Vionnet in 1937 and was given to the V&A in 1968 by Cecil Beaton. It will be on display in the Horst: Photographer of Style exhibition, due to open in September 2014. The dress will be one of 9 other examples of French couture from the 1930s, reflecting […]

Keep reading

Resource Planning at the V&A Museum

The V&A is an ambitious and inquisitive organization. It produces blockbuster exhibitions, like last year’s David Bowie Is and the forthcoming Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty  and has an exciting range of contemporary events as part of its monthly Friday Lates. Aside from its Public Programme of exhibitions and displays the V&A is also involved in […]

Keep reading
Newly photographed, following the completion of conservation work © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Grotesque Faces

When visiting the Metalwork Conservation studios the other week I came across this familiar face in the midst of treatment. It is a gilt-bronze ‘mask’ which will feature in our display about the influence of Louis XIV’s court on European art and design. Referring to it just as a mask is perhaps slightly misleading as, measuring […]

Keep reading
T.399&a-1974 Elsa Schiaparelli, Dress and Jacket with gilt embroidery mounted for ‘Horst Photographer of Style’ on a full figure Proportion Ltd mannequin.

Style Never Goes Out of Fashion

The photographs in the exhibition will be supplemented by a selection of 9 ensembles showcasing the work of designers that collaborated with Horst. These include some of the most prominent and influential fashion designers of the 1930s, such as Elsa Schiaparelli, Coco Chanel and Madeleine Vionnet. For the 9 exquisite ensembles, some of which have […]

Keep reading
Apron worn to de-install The Glamour of Italian Fashion 1945-2014. Photograph © Sadie Hough, 2014

Pockets of Glamour

As the last vestiges of Italian glamour are obscured by tissue and Tyvek, and packed away ready for the first venue of an American tour, I am reminded of the role that clothing plays in getting a job done. At the V&A, the periods in which exhibitions are installed and then eventually taken down are characterised by increased […]

Keep reading
photo 1

So what are you doing with a science degree in a design museum…

At the very beginning of my internship I posted (in rather mushy way) about the FTIR machine that we have here in the lab. We have quite a good setup here and over the past number of months I’ve been trying to take every advantage I can to use it. FTIR stands for Fourier Transform […]

Keep reading
linnens

‘A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words’ Part II

There are currently well over a quarter of a million images of V&A objects available online through Search the Collections, but the V&A Photographic Studio is always in demand to photograph more. The Photographers are kept very busy with a steady stream (at times perhaps more a ‘torrent’) of objects coming through their doors to […]

Keep reading
Blog picture 6 thumb

A Spring Cleaning in Paintings Conservation

This week’s guest post, written by Arabella Peaver and Morgan Wylder, describes the conservation of a painting by John Frederick Herring. With only a few weeks until the V&A’s Constable exhibition opens to the public, some of the Constable paintings normally on display in our paintings galleries will be relocated to the exhibition. This offers a great opportunity for us to have some […]

Keep reading
thumbrug

Conserving a Dutch Table Carpet

Today we have another guest entry by Katy Smith, one of the V&A’s Textile Conservators who has been doing sterling work on objects that will be displayed in the new galleries. The smallest of all the tapestries being prepared for the Europe galleries is a Dutch ‘table carpet’ (V&A T.279-1927). The name is deceptive, technically it […]

Keep reading
The current setup for a long duration time lapse. Its hoped that we might gain some insight into the decay rate by recording the progress over the next 6 months or so.

Mini Post No. 7 – Using a Raspberry Pi to watch a handbag decay

So a while back I posted an image of one of the plastic handbags we have here in the Conservation Science Dept. We use these non-museum objects as sacrificial lambs in the aid of heritage science. We have a second handbag that has started to dramatically decay. As we will use any excuse here in the […]

Keep reading