Tag: Europe

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February half-term 2016 Europe Family Fun

During February half-term, we welcomed 14,273 participants to celebrate the opening of the new Europe galleries 1600-1815. Four activities were focused on the Ommengang painting of 1616 as part of the Family Art Fun programme. There was mask-making on the Imagination Station, digital soundscapes as part of Digital Kids, an interactive Pop-up Performance and headdress […]

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V&A Podcast: Salon III – ‘Europe through non-European Eyes’

Coffer, late 16th century - early 17th century, Japan. Museum no. FE.33-1983, Purchased with the assistance of the Garner Fund, © Victoria & Albert Museum, London

Meeting once again in the Europe Galleries on the 10th February, our esteemed guests were challenged with the task of flipping their perspective on the history of Europe, and looking at it from the outside in, under February’s Salon theme: ‘Europe through non-European Eyes’. Our three speakers were José Ramón Marcaida (CRASSH at the University […]

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V&A Podcast: Salon II: ‘Europa and Britannia’

Valance, Unknown, about 1790, England, Museum no. T.63-1936, © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

There is a beautiful timeliness to the ‘What Was Europe?’ Salon series, which was seen particularly in the most recent Salon’s theme: ‘Europa vs. Britannia’. For the title of the Salon, we see ‘Europa’, the name of the goddess from Ancient Greek mythology, famed for her abduction by Zeus in the form of a white […]

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V&A Podcast: Salon I: ‘Where was Europe?’

The Globe, installation by the Cuban art collective Los Carpinteros

To celebrate the opening of the new Europe 1600-1815 galleries, the V&A, with the support of the British Academy, is hosting a series of Salon evenings. Leading academics and ‘rising stars’ in research right now have been invited to discuss variations on the overarching theme of the series, the question: “What Was Europe?” The events […]

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The Missing Miniature

Portrait miniature, enamel on copper, London. Mounted into a carved ivory snuffbox.
Inscription on the rim of the box: John the 1st Earl of Spencer. painted by Jean Etienne Liotard. 

Museum no. LOAN:GILBERT.408-2008

Jean-Etienne Liotard (1702-89) originally trained as an enamellist in Geneva, but he is perhaps best known today for his wonderful half-length portraits in pastel. He painted an enormous variety of people, from members of his own family, to esteemed contemporaries such as Voltaire and David Garrick, as well as various members of European royal and […]

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Family Art Fun in the Europe Galleries 1600-1815

Europe Family Tour group with Curator Dawn Hoskin

Since November, eight families have been training to be volunteer tour guides for the new Europe galleries that opened in December 2015. Led by storyteller Diana Olutunmogun, families take part in six training sessions before delivering tours for other families during February half-term 2016 as part of the Family Art Fun programme. The first three […]

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Paul Storr

Silver-gilt basket, London, 1797-8. Height 13.5 cm.
Museum no. LOAN:Gilbert.735-2008

Paul Storr (1771-1844) was the most technologically sophisticated producer of silver of the Regency period. In the V&A’s Whiteley Silver Galleries, the current temporary display of highlights of the Gilbert Collection includes a substantial silver-gilt basket supplied by Paul Storr to the wealthy collector and patron, William Beckford (1760-1844) of Fonthill Abbey, Wiltshire. This basket, […]

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The Brown Suit: Audio Recordings

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The other week I found myself in the Textile Conservation studios, a microphone in front of me, contemplating how much sweat may have soaked into a coat. I should quickly make it clear that it wasn’t a coat being worn by a perspiring colleague, but rather a very smart wool coat dating from the 1780s. […]

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Medal Cabinet Appeal – Elizabeth Bisley, Assistant Curator

Elizabeth and the Medal Cabinet

‘This cabinet is an incredibly important example of Napoleonic design, it tells so many stories about design, craftsmanship, politics and luxury in early nineteenth-century France, and would be an amazing addition to our new European galleries.’ In this series of blogs we’re interviewing various members of staff who come in contact with the Napoleonic Medal […]

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Come Fly With Me

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Last week we decided how to make a putto fly. A putto (plural putti) is a figure represented in art as a chubby male child, often nude and sometimes with wings. This particular putto is a statuette made from limewood which was then painted and gilded. He was made in South Germany around 1755-60 and will be featuring in […]

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