Tag: exhibition

Back to the blog front page

A Room of One’s Own

Over the last two years I have had the pleasure of working with so many extraordinary artists and makers.Many have welcomed me into their homes and studios, sharing thoughts and ideas – their hospitality and generosity have added an unexpected dimension to the exhibition, which goes beyond professional courtesy.I had visited Jo Budd in her studio several times and was immediately drawn to the sense of peace and tranquillity in her workspace. It was not only a privilege to be invited into her home and studio but was also a joy

Keep reading

From the Horse’s Mouth

Our Bookings Office (who has the patience of a saint) has confirmed that tickets for individuals are indeed now available to book by phone or online. Go to https://transactions.vam.ac.uk/peo/search_results.asp?txtSource=FastSearchortelephone on +44 (0)20 7942 2211. Meanwhile the contractors are busy building the exhibition – the entire space is a hard hat only zone (the testosterone is palpable), the installation schedule is being drawn up, couriers are being booked in, the team of conservators are on hand and I've stocked the cupboards with all sorts of nutritious snacks to see us through the 12 hour days (who am I kidding – it …

Keep reading

England expects…

Every woman to do her duty.Yes Ladies – now is the time to take up your needle and with patience and perseverance communicate your loyalty, patriotism and commitment to proving that we are not idle whilst our men are away.We should follow our sister’s example – reflecting our pride in our nation, celebrating our victories whilst acknowledging the loss ofour menfolk. All this is of course a preamble to another story.I have always been intrigued by the George III coverlet – the sense that it is perhaps two projects. One the intricate piecing over papers to create segmented circles, some …

Keep reading

Sou Fujimoto in the Studio

We have just been sent a lovely little video by Sou Fujimoto, the architect who will be building a hollow, transparent tree-form on the Architecture Gallery landing. You may recall from a blog post last year that Sou Fujimoto has modified his design from a curvilinear form to one consisting of angular polygon elements. We had discussed how we might connect these separate elements to create the trunk, branches etc – and he has come up with an ingenious solution involving tough cable ties. http://vimeo.com/11952381 We gave each of the architects HD video cameras (courtesy of Flip Video) which they …

Keep reading

Reading Chambers

I've been thinking a lot about reading spaces recently… Rintala Eggertsson Architects will be building a tower of books for the exhibition, which will be located at the bottom of the National Art Library staircase. As a re-evaluation of notions of the 'archive', the tower will extend to three storeys, and when on the top level you will have a view straight into the National Art Library's reading room – itself, of course, one of the Museum's natural destination for moments of retreat and refuge. While researching my introductory essay for the '1:1' exhibition catalogue, I've been spending a few …

Keep reading

Vazio S/A – Spiral Booths visualisation

In December, we discussed with Carlos Teixeira how to rationalise and simplify the spatial arrangement of the performance booths in his structure, 'Spiral Booths' (based on the voids found amongst the concrete stilts of suspended Brazilian palafitte buildings). We received a link from Carlos this morning for a 3-D visualisation for the new design – something that will be very useful for our technical consultants on the project (they are essential to the exhibition – crucial structural engineering and building advice!) http://vimeo.com/11994858 It's actually quite fascinating to see exactly how all these booths fit together, something that is quite hard …

Keep reading

Shenzhen-Hong Kong Architecture Biennale

I've just got back from a very productive research trip to China. In addition to meetings with architects and designers in Hong Kong, Shanghai and Beijing, I spent a day at the Shenzhen-Hong Kong Architecture Biennale. Shenzhen is emblematic of China's recent urban development, being the very first city to be given special economic zone status (in 1979). Located at the far northern end of the Hong Kong MTRtrain system, Shenzhen is also one of the main gateways into mainland China. Making the trip to Shenzhen was particularly relevant forthe '1:1' exhibition as fourof the architects invited to submit concept …

Keep reading

Don’t Panic!

Pottered in this morning, full of the joys of spring (well almost) – opened the emails and found a flurry of activity re my last posting. Just to reassure everyone that there will be a total of 300 tickets available for the conference, and only just over a third have been releasedfor groups (strictly limited – no additional discounted has been offered for groups). Which leaves nearly 200 tickets available – as soon as our Learning & Interpretation team give me the nod that these are going on sale you will be the first to know. In the meantime, our …

Keep reading

I spoke too soon…

There I was – on the one hand revelling in my new found freedom from meetings and on the other feeling abandoned when suddenly Team Quilts sprang back into action. We have a new lead on the maker of the George III Revewing the Troops coverlet – can we fit in a quick research trip before we start to install? Can I really accept an invitation to the Tokyo International Great Quilt Festival due to open next week? Backto backpress interviews are lining up and at some point Ireally need to get the washing machine fixed (the husband stopped seeing …

Keep reading

‘Tis the season…

to count our blessings. Before I sign off for the Christmas holidays I would like to share with you some very poignant and extraordinary stories. The first revolves around a young girl of 15, exiled from her family for stealing a length of printed cotton and sentenced to seven years' transportation.Grace Stevens set sail forVan Dieman's land on board HMS Rajah in 1841. In contemporary accounts Grace was described as a housemaid, or nurse girl; a red head with florid complextion and light blue eyes. She had a scar on the thumb of her left hand. The nineteenth century prison …

Keep reading