Tag: music

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V&A acquires the Glastonbury Archive

Visiting Worthy Farm, the home of the Glastonbury Festival is an amazing experience at any time of the year but in the weeks before ‘curtain-up’ it is a fascinating insight into the creativity of the world’s longest running music and performing arts festival. The 44 year old family of Glastonbury come together to create the […]

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Friday Late ‘Sound It Out’: Boiler Room Reflections

The first Friday Late of 2014, ‘Sound It Out’, saw an incredible 5812 visitors to the Museum to experience a night dedicated to the exploration of music’s relationship to technology – from analogue to digital, from live streaming to digital manipulation. A large part of the evening’s success, no doubt, was the involvement of Boiler […]

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Behind the Scenes at Friday Late ‘Sound It Out’

January’s Friday Late ‘Sound It Out’ was an incredibly successful evening with 5812 visitors in total and many more who were sadly unable to get into the Museum as we reached maximum capacity by 8.30pm - a first in the history of Friday Late.  The event looked at music’s relationship to technology. The projects we showcased represented […]

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A Musical Interlude: Henry Cole and Matthew Digby Wyatt

With the London Handel Festival due to start in early March I thought I’d share with you some of my favourite documents in the V&A Archive to get us (well, me!) in the mood: a set of ink drawings of historical musical instruments by the architect and art historian Matthew Digby Wyatt (1820-1877). Henry Cole (1808-1882), the […]

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Music for a While: Benjamin Britten at the V&A

While rummaging through a box of old photographs I chanced upon this one of the composer Benjamin Britten (1913-1976) and tenor Peter Pears (1910-1986) taken at recital they gave at the V&A. Tenor Peter Pears and pianist Benjamin Britten on stage during a recital in the Raphael Cartoon gallery. V&A Archive, accession no. A0212. © […]

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Heart on his Sleeve: Vaughan Oliver

I recently paid a visit to the graphic designer Vaughan Oliver, best known for his work over the years for the record label 4AD. As the producer of the Pixies, the Cocteau Twins, Red House Painters, and Modern English, 4AD helped to define the sound of British post-punk music; but Oliver defined the look. Founder Ivo Watts-Russell gave him free rein on developing the graphic identity of the label, and he responded with a body of work that is remarkable for its visual density and consistency, featuring quintessentially postmodern tactics like erratic typography, cut-and-paste visuals, and appropriated imagery. Oliver now …

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