Tag: print

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The Guard Book Project – A Resource for Research

Portrait miniatures submitted for appraisal in 1939.

Well… I never knew that….. This digitisation project is providing a unique opportunity for various areas of research about the museums collections, the history of the building, exhibitions, activities, and items that were here for a short period of time for displays, or appraisals, and those that left the building never to be seen again, with examples in this blog, of […]

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Teacup Travels episode on Cbeebies uses Museum object as inspiration – last chance to see!

A Japanese woodblock was chosen as the inspiration for a new Teacup Travels episode on Cbeebies. Teacup Travels is historical fiction for young children incorporating genuine historical artefacts into dramatic adventure stories. It is on display at the V&A South Kensington site in Japan, Room 45, Case 13 for one more week only, until Sunday […]

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Tom Hammick, winner of the V&A Prize at the International Print Biennale, Newcastle, 2016

The V&A has collected the best of contemporary printmaking since its foundation and now has an internationally renowned collection of modern and contemporary prints. For this reason the V&A has been closely involved with the International Print Biennale in Newcastle since it was established in 2009. The biennale is the largest printmaking event in the […]

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A New Line from South Kensington to Bexhill on Sea

Some exhibitions really do stem from a casual chat between curators over drinks. About a year ago, a curator from the De La Warr Pavilion at Bexhill on the south coast was talking about their plans to celebrate their iconic 1930s Modernist building to an NAL curator. Our curator mentioned a collection of material in […]

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Saint Cecilia in V&A collections

Very few works by the Italian artist Stefano Maderno (1576-1636) survive and his fame rests primarily on the sculpture of Saint Cecilia in the church of Santa Cecilia in Rome, made when he was 23. The sculpture was commissioned by Paolo Emilio Sfondrati (1560-1618) who opened the sarcophagus of Saint Cecilia. Through the inscription beneath, […]

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The Tower of babel – Shop of the Day 51

The Tower of babel – Shop of the Day 51 Roman Road today,and this recently closed printing press in East London.  First opened in 1897 and run by 3 successive generations.  Amongst countless works undertaken even the Suffragette’s handbills were printed here. Some lovely stories written by ‘Gentle Author’ on ‘Spitalfields Life’ here http://www.spitalfieldslife.com/2010/02/03/gary-arber-printer/ I thought […]

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Cast a clout and get your umbrella out

It’s spring time! The sun is out, ‘clouts’ are being cast left right and centre*, and everyone is looking a little bit happier. What better time then, to talk about umbrellas? After all, the aforementioned sun is still fighting those fluffy limelight-stealing clouds for our attentions and the ‘threat’ of rain is a spring time […]

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Location Scout Part II: Resist block printing

Resist block printed cotton dyed with Indigo.

After a hurried fortnight of preparing storyboards and briefing the film crew, they have now been packed onto their flights and are off to India to capture some of the remarkable textile processes that I saw on my reccie trip in January.   I visited Kaladera in Rajasthan, looking particularly for Indigo dyeing workshops.  There I was […]

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To the source

In a recent post for the display Blue and White: British Printed Ceramics Florence Tyler posed the question ‘Can a display exist without objects?’. Well there are certainly ceramics in the display, you will be pleased to know, but there are some things missing: the original artworks that inspired the ceramic decoration.       The V&A Ceramic Galleries were built […]

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Happy Thanksgiving from the Factory!

With the last days of November approaching, many American minds are turning to their Thanksgiving celebrations. Since becoming an official federal holiday in 1863, the last Thursday of the month has been reserved for visiting family and friends, watching the (American) football game, and sharing an enormous turkey dinner. Having spent weeks eagerly reviewing my […]

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