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Detail of a sinking ship from E.32-1949

Who Was Wheatcroft?

Whilst cataloguing, I often reflect on the many engravers whose work is now in our store, either anonymous, or signed only with cryptic initials or widespread surnames, and are fated to remain unknown. Only their work remains to silently attest to the skills of these unknown craftsmen and women. I may wish that A.R. (E.126-1941) […]

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© Victoria and Albert Museum

Printing workshop with Speed Resident Noemi Niederhauser

On Wednesday 29th and Thursday 30th of October families were invited to take part in a print making workshop run by Speed Resident, Noemi Niederhauser. Everyone was encourage to get creative with inspiration drawn from a textile piece that Noemi has found in the collection. With carved potato stamps and self-drawn paper stencils children and […]

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St Martin de Porres

Today on Sanctus Ignotum we have a case study in race relations, and our first South American saint. Born in Lima, Peru in 1579, the illegitimate son of a Spanish knight and a liberated black slave, Martin was initially apprenticed to a barber-surgeon. He initially joined the Dominican Order as a lay-helper, though his dedication […]

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Petka's head

St. Petka

This Orthodox saint’s proper name is Paraskeva of the Balkans, but she is also known alternatively as Petka. She was born on the shores of the Sea of Marmara at the start of the 11th century. She claimed that God spoke to her at the age of 10 while in church, quoting Jesus (and therefore […]

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This engraving forms the title page of a volume. It depicts an ancient stone, with a cameo portrait of Giovanni Battista Piranesi in the centre. The portrait is a copy of a self-portrait by Piranesi, copied by his son for this volume. There are Roman engravings both above and below the cameo. Underneath the stone there are several classical motifs, including an armoured soldier, a city plan of Rome, and Roman vases. VA E.3958-1908

Born on This Day: Giovanni Battista Piranesi

In the late-18th and early-19th centuries, increased travel and archaeological discoveries, at sites such as Pompeii and Herculaneum in Italy, led to a revival of interest in ancient and classical decoration. The work of architect and printmaker Giovanni Battista Piranesi (1720-1778) helped to pioneer this rediscovery of Roman remains and he was one of the […]

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St. Theresa of Lisieux

Today is the celebration of one of Catholicism’s less flamboyant but more popular saints, St. Theresa of Lisieux, commonly known as the ‘Little Flower of Jesus’. Her saintliness is not a result of holy pillows, levitations, stigmata or loyal animal friends, but rather it is because of the quiet, sweet and serious way that she […]

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Credit Crunch

Bang in the middle of the display ‘A World to Win. Posters of Revolution’ you come across an eye catching hot pink, black and white spotty slogan screenprint that screams out from the gallery ‘There’s A Credit Crunch Not A Creative Crunch’. The creative industries battle cry – designed and printed by Aida Wild. Aida […]

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Wallpaper, Walter Crane, 1879. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

Beach Scenes

Occasional thunderstorms aside, the recent warm weather has many people spending a lot of time daydreaming about the beach. Rather than braving the crowds and seagulls, however, I have done some exploring in the Prints, Drawings, and Paintings department, to discover what sand and sea-related objects can be found in our collection. If you also […]

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