Tag: Rapid Response Collecting

Rapid Response Collecting is a new strand to the V&A’s collecting activity. Objects are collected in response to major moments in history that touch the world of design and manufacturing.

Ranging from Christian Louboutin shoes in five shades of ‘nude’; a cuddly toy wolf used as an object of political dissent; to the world’s first 3D-printed gun, each new acquisition raises a different question about globalisation, popular culture, political and social change, demographics, technology, regulation or the law.

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Rapid Response Collecting – Burkini and Refugee Flag

Refugee Flag Install 30/11/2016

A burkini and refugee flag are the two latest acquisitions by the Museum’s Design, Architecture and Digital department, recently installed in the Rapid Response Collecting gallery. Text by Mariana Pestana, Curator of Future Design, and Kristian Volsing, Research Curator – Videogames The refugee flag was commissioned by the Refugee Nation, a not-for-profit creative project led […]

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The Rise and Fall of Flappy Bird and the collecting of the V&A’s first App

2014HC3172

As part of the V&A’s new Rapid Response Collecting strategy, the Contemporary Architecture, Digital and Design team has collected the museum’s first app, Flappy Bird. A simple side-scrolling video game with 2D retro-style graphics, the player controls a bird attempting to fly through rows of green pipes, avoiding contact with them by tapping the phone’s […]

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Museums and Protest

Goddess of democracy, Beijing, China, 1989

The V&A’s forthcoming Disobedient Objects exhibition challenges the image that many people have of what museums contain and what they are for. However museums can and sometimes do engage with social and political events happening in the world around us. The following are four recent instances of this. The June 4th Museum This June marked […]

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Wearable tech: who wears it?

Motarola WT4000 Wearable Terminal

Look carefully at the wrists of those around you and you will likely see someone sporting an activity tracker of some kind – a Nike Fuelband, a Fitbit or even a Misfit Shine. Bright and shiny, these health and fitness gadgets are a new type of personal accessory: devices, which in the words of Jawbone, […]

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