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Living with the Past – Part 2

By Stuart Frost In my last blog entry I posted some photographs documenting the installation of the glass roof for the new day-lit gallery, work that took place in July 2009. This new piece of architecture, the first on the V&A site for over one hundred years, is one of the most exciting aspects of […]

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Living with the Past: Part One

By Stuart Frost I have spent over seven years, or thereabouts, working on the Medieval & Renaissance Galleries. I find it hard to believe that my role on the project has finally come to an end. The project team offices are in the process of being cleared and I have taken up a new job […]

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A Missal from the Abbey of Saint Denis, Paris

By Stuart Frost The pages that illustrate this blog entry are from a magnificent missal in the V&A’s collections, one of the finest surviving examples of a fourteenth century Gothic manuscript. A missal is a book which contains all the texts and music needed by a priest to celebrate Mass. This particular missal was made […]

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A Labour of Love

By Stuart Frost There is an extensive and varied programme of events to support the Medieval & Renaissance Galleries. Activities, talks, special projects and lectures will take place throughout 2010. A fascinating demonstration took place on Saturday 5th December, the first weekend the galleries were open to the public, and it focused on a unique object that […]

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The Medieval & Renaissance Galleries are open!

By Stuart Frost The first meeting of the Concept Team, a group of four people whose role was to shape and steer the development of the Medieval & Renaissance Galleries, took place in June 2002. The official opening of the galleries took place last week on the evening of Tuesday 1st December 2009. On Wednesday 2nd December […]

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Music from the leaf of a choirbook

By Stuart Frost I’ve chosen to illustrate this blog entry with a manuscript leaf that was orginally part of a choirbook made around 1250, probably in Germany. The leaf is decorated with an illuminated letter that depicts the Annunciation, the moment when the Angel Gabriel appears to the Virgin Mary and tells her that she […]

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The Listening Gallery Part 4: Music for the harpsichord

By Stuart Frost  The Medieval & Renaissance Galleries will open to the public on Wednesday 2nd December 2009. As you might expect installation of the objects and displays is dominating the work of the project team at the moment and will continue to do so over the short period of time that remains. For those […]

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The Listening Gallery Part 3: A Notation Knife

By Stuart Frost I’ve written about The Listening Gallery project before. It  is a two-year collaboration between the Royal College of Music and the V&A. The project draws on recent research in music, art & design and technology. One of the aims of the project is to connect key objects in the V&A’s collections with recordings of music […]

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St Thérèse of Lisieux

By Stuart Frost Earlier this week relics of Saint Thérèse of Lisieux arrived at Westminster Cathedral in London as the culmination of a month long tour of Britain. The reaction from the public and the media has been remarkable. The relics of this French nun, who died in 1897 at the age of  twenty-four, have drawn […]

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A Game of Two Halves

If you haven't seen the terrific little show at the Courtauld called "Design Drawings from Renaissance Italy," you're too late:it closed on May 17. Icaught the exhibition just before that, and it inspired me to write a quick post on very early design drawings. Many people think that professional design didn't begin until the nineteenth century; England's own Christopher Dresser is often called the first industrial designer. But eminent artists like Michelangelo, Hans Holbein, and Albrecht Durer created designs for decorative objects. (Holbein's drawings for metalwork and jewelry were a highlight of the recent exhibition on his work at Tate …

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