Tag: sculpture

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Aureus coin of Emperor Hadrian

Out On Display #1: Hadrian and Antinous

Welcome to ‘Out in the Museum’; the V&A’s new blog series on all things LGBTQ+! We’ll be covering art, history, museum events and advocacy. Your comments and feedback are welcomed. This is the first in a regular series of posts on objects in our collection with LGBTQ+ histories.   Coin, head of the Emperor Hadrian […]

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Detail of A.135-1946, alabaster statue of St. Fiacre © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

St. Fiacre

Today marks the feast of Saint Fiacre (d.670). This semi-mythical 7th century Irish saint was a sort of nurse-cum-hermit who would tend to the ailments of all who visited his oratory so long as they met one condition: that they were a man. Women were cautioned to stay away from his retreat on pain of […]

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Jenny and one of the Wolsey Angels in our Medieval and Renaissance Gallery, Room 50.

Save the Wolsey Angels – Jenny Wedgbury, Acting Programme Manager for Families

‘I think the Wolsey Angels should be saved and remain on display at the V&A because they’re beautiful and enigmatic, and a great example of early renaissance sculpture in Britain.’ In this series of blogs we’re interviewing various members of staff who come in contact with the Wolsey Angels which we are currently trying to […]

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CIS:A.8-1967

Born on This Day: ‘The Winter Queen’ Elizabeth Stuart, Queen of Bohemia

This day in 1596 saw the birth of Princess Elizabeth Stuart. Daughter of Anne of Denmark and James VI of Scotland (later James I of England), Elizabeth was the sister of Charles I of England and later became Queen of Bohemia. Elizabeth will have a visible presence in the new Europe Galleries in the form […]

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Detail of St. Louis of Toulouse © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

St. Louis of Toulouse

What do discarded crowns, Barcelona and Zac Efron all have in common? The answer is St. Louis of Toulouse (1274-1297). This former bishop was a holy man of impeccable saintly lineage, who could count King St. Louis IX of France, St. Elizabeth of Hungary and St. Margaret of Hungary among his hallowed family tree. He […]

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706-1890, gilt leather altar frontal showing SS. Roch (L) and Sebastian (R), © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

St. Roch

Many saints’ lives are dull affairs full of praying and fasting, proselytising and general do-gooding. St. Roch’s vita has all of these elements plus a good amount of gruesomeness, mysticism, and a faithful animal friend. Born near Montpellier around 1295, his chest was miraculously marked from birth with the sign of the cross. The infant […]

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Unpacking the angels

Save the Wolsey Angels – Isabel Hardingham, Gallery Assistant

‘The reunion of the Wolsey angels is a miraculous event; they deserve to be celebrated together at the V&A as works of art.’ In this series of blogs we’re interviewing various members of staff who come in contact with the Wolsey Angels which we are currently trying to reunite, to try and find out just […]

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Newly photographed, following the completion of conservation work © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Grotesque Faces

When visiting the Metalwork Conservation studios the other week I came across this familiar face in the midst of treatment. It is a gilt-bronze ‘mask’ which will feature in our display about the influence of Louis XIV’s court on European art and design. Referring to it just as a mask is perhaps slightly misleading as, measuring […]

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1198-1893, medal showing Pope St. Sixtus II, Italy, 16th century (C) Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Pope St. Sixtus II

Here we have another medal with another pope on it. This familiar line continues when I tell you that Sixtus II was also the immediate successor to Pope Stephen, who we covered in the previous post, and that he was probably martyred in the same way, and as part of the very same crackdown by […]

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IMAG0589

An Unknown Soldier? The V&A’s First World War Memorial

Simple and solemn in cream Hopton Wood stone, the V&A’s monument to its 1914-18 war dead sits unobtrusively in the main entrance hall. Designed in 1919 by the sculptor and typographer Eric Gill, it was commissioned by the Museum with the dual aims of commemorating the fallen and acquiring an example of Gill lettering. As […]

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