Tag: William Morris

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The finished panel. Museum no. C.317-1927.

Stained Glass on Paper: Morris & Co. and the Pre-Raphaelites

[Stained glass] is a very limited art and its limitations are its strength. (Edward Burne-Jones, 1897) The qualities needed in the design […] are beauty and character of outline; exquisite, clear, precise drawing of incident. (William Morris, 1890) In my previous post, I looked at some early stained glass designs, and mentioned how the established techniques […]

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new iPad game, Strawberry Thief

The Strawberry Thief iPad Game

I’m extremely excited to announce the launch of my new iPad game, Strawberry Thief. It’s changed a lot since the early prototype I made at the V&A earlier in the year, but I am thrilled with how the finished piece turned out. Download: Strawberry Thief Free iPad Game I was Games Designer in Residence at the […]

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Wolsey Angel

Discovering legacies at the V&A: Fred Rowley

When I first started as the V&A’s Legacies Manager just over a year ago, I quickly became aware of how lucky I was to be in this role.  Every day I discover something new about the Museum – from the rare and often unique objects that are left to us, to the fascinating stories of […]

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William Morris and the Hammersmith Socialist League, c.1880
© Victoria & Albert Museum, London

Romantic idealists

  In 1947, the immediate post-war period, the V&A Circulation department recruited three women who were to become legendary curators in their own V&A lifetime and beyond: Elizabeth Aslin (furniture), Shirley Bury (metalwork) and Barbara Morris (textiles, glass and ceramics).  In the late 1940s, a time of progressive socialism not just austerity, Bury and Morris […]

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The home screen for the Strawberry Thief. © Laura Southall

Glorious Games in Digital Dundee

Greetings from sunny Dundee! Sitting in the lovely McManus Museum café, I’m having a bit of a break from the frenetic and fabulous Dare to be Digital Protoplay Festival. Hosted annually by Abertay University, the festival is a hub for new and aspiring gamers, including our Games Designer in residence, Sophia George. The tent in […]

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NorthCourtSMALL

It’s a cover-up! Interior design at the South Kensington Museum

Something caught my eye in this old photograph of the V&A’s North Court taken in the late 19th century: The North Court in the late 19th century. Museum no. E.1101-1989. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London You may not recognise this space but you’ll have been in it if you’ve seen any of the V&A’s […]

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A farewell Q&A with Sophia George

We will sadly be bidding our Games Designer in residence, Sophia George, goodbye in a few days time. I thought I would grab her for a few questions about her residency before she leaves. LS: What was it like to be based in the V&A for six months? SG: It was great to be based […]

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Game testing at the Museum of Childhood

Recently, we decided to mix things up and hold some open studio sessions at the V&A Museum of Childhood in Bethnal Green, as the games I design are largely aimed at children. I was sat amongst the dollhouse collection of the museum, with my sketchbook, notes, books I’ve been studying from and six iPads running my Strawberry […]

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The first few weeks of my V&A residency

For those new to this blog, I’m Sophia George and I will be working in the Museum until April next year developing a game design inspired by the British Galleries, which displays art and design from 1500-1900. After my residency finishes, I will be working at the University of Abertay in Dundee to create the […]

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Morris pattern book

This Week’s Post: Free From Arsenic

It seems that V&A Conservation are in favour at the BBC at the moment. This week, V&A Senior Paper Conservator Susan Catcher is featured on the BBC Four documentary, Fabric of Britain: The Story of Wallpaper, talking about the difficulties (and dangers) of treating wallpaper containing arsenic. Death by Wallpaper? Prior to the late 18th […]

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