Tag: word and image

Back to the blog front page

Olympic Posters: History Lessons

This is the second in a series of posts looking at Olympic posters from the V&A collection

Keep reading

Olympic Posters

As I sit down to write the first entry for this blog, London is buzzing with Olympic fever: there is only one day left to go before the opening of the London 2012 Olympic Games. This presents me with a perfect opening subject – especially as Olympic posters are an area of the collection that we’ve been focussing on for some time at the V&A.

Keep reading

Guest Blog Entry: Paper and Pearls: Hans Collaert’s Designs for Pendants

Guest blog entry by Frances AllittIn the painting below, a girl dressed in a delicate lace collar stares off to the left of the viewer. Though her identity is now lost, the girl remains enchanting to behold. Framing her face are two pearl earrings and, around her neck, a double string of pearls.

Keep reading

‘Monuments of your Love built up to the Cloudes…’ [1]

Guest blog entry byBryony Bartlett-RawlingsDuring the first weekend of June 2012 Britain will embrace a mood of celebration as it celebrates the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. The festivities will include street parties throughout the country and the Regatta on Sunday 3rd June will be one of the largest flotillas ever assembled in London on the river Thames.

Keep reading

Mermaids

Guest blog entry: Bryony Bartlett-RawlingsMermaids, Mermen and other fantastical creatures of the sea have featured heavily in our folklore for centuries. The first stories of mermaids appeared in Assyria in about 1000 BC. One of these earliest legends describes how the goddess Atargatis, mother of the Assyrian queen Semiramis, unintentionally killed the mortal shepherd whom she loved. Distraught, she jumped into a lake to take the form of a fish. However the water failed to completely cover her beauty; only transforming her into a fish-like form from the waist down.

Keep reading

Ornament prints and contemporary art

Gombrich observed that ‘every picture owes more to other pictures painted before than it owes to nature’[1]. Designers and artists have often looked to the past for inspiration and ornament prints from all periods can be an unparalleled resource in this exercise.

Keep reading

Guest blog entry: Stefano della Bella

Guest blog entry by Rebecca Wall

Keep reading

Elizabeth Taylor – Jewellery and Ornament

You may have noticed some of the press recently making the rounds for the sale of Elizabeth Taylor’s jewels (among other parts of her collection). Looking at the lots on offer one wonders how such a petite woman ever managed tomove around so enormous are the carat weights of some of the stones. One of my favourite galleries at the V&A is the William and Judith Bollinger Jewellery Gallery. If you ever have a case of Holly Golightly’s mean reds, the spiral display of rings here will cheer you up in no time. It’s all too easy to hold up …

Keep reading

What is ornament, what is an ornament print and why do they matter?

Ornament is decoration or embellishment. It is any additional detail added to an object, interior or architectural structure which serves no other purpose than to make it more interesting, arresting or beautiful to us. Take this Sèvres soup plate for instance. The richly painted and gilded decoration adds absolutely nothing to the function of the plate, but the effect is certainly more interesting than a plain white plate. Catherine the Great evidently thought so too, as she had the service to which this plate belongs re-designed eight times before she felt it was quite right. An ornament print is a …

Keep reading

“The True and Perfect Description Of Three Voyages”

Now that my residency, co-hosted by Word and Image Department and Paper Conservation, has come to an end, I wanted to write one last entry. The experience has been an extraordinary one, not least in terms of the generosity that Curators in WID and conservators in Paper Conservation have shown in sharing their time and expertise. I have been led into stores rooms holding miniature stage sets, Indian hand painted flower albums, daguerreotypes, wardrobes of 16th Century gowns, intricate lace patterns from Venice and kimono stencils from Japan. The list could go on and on.

Keep reading