Tag: word and image

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Pausing for Thought – and the Residency Extended until December, 2008

A pause, not a full stop – the residency period was due to end after my last posting. However following a number of discussions and meetings, I received an invitation from the Word and Image Department and the Paper Conservation Studio to continue working on the residency until the end of 2008.A wonderful opportunity and second phase of the journey! There are certain ideas that I now want to focus on – and the last few weeks have been spent trying to “unravel” some of these.

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Time Has Passed By…

Time has passed by since my last posting. The weeks have been filled with activities of a different kind – with a different focus. A move from private to public domain. In the months that I spent developing the drawings, time often seemed to be suspended as I attempted to resolve a range of issues in the work.

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Some Thoughts and Responses

Some thoughts and responses to the installation of residency drawings and selected objects:As part of the ‘stepping back’ process in order consider the installed works, I thought that I would ask some of the curators and conservators at the V&A for their thoughts. No single response to a work of art can be identical to another as we each carry with us our own individual life histories and cultural and social experiences.

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Stepping Back – ‘Gaze’ in Gallery 102

With the installation of my new work and the objects that I had selected from the collections now completed, I can take a step back.The series of drawings, ‘Gaze’, that I have been concentrating on over several months, were made especially in response to the space in which they are now being shown. They hang suspended in mid-air within a line of wall-based glazed cases.

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Thirty Pieces of Silver

There is a certain deceit in a reflected image – a reflection in a mirror gives us the idea that we are seeing a truthful likeness. But of course we are party to this conspiracy ourselves, knowing it not to be the case. And the mirror gives a sense of depth that again we allow ourselves to be taken in by, the surface of the glass being impenetrable and unyielding.The Claude glass or black convex mirror which I have been using to make many of my recent drawings and which I described in the entry entitled, “Polarities of Light and …

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Pace of time – pace of touch – pace of life

Touch and time. Everything seems to take on a different timescale when one is drawing, thinking, touching the surface of the drawing again. Sitting and looking. Waiting.Looking through objects in the collections has taken on a similar pace. Time slows down in order to examine them at such close hand – to register the hidden folds of a pattern or the soiled edges of a greeting card.Yet the backdrop to these activities which allows lingering to be the norm, is one of a totally different pace. Running to stand still.

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Piercing the Surface

Cut, incise, prick, singe, burn – I have been revisiting ways in which the surface of a sheet of paper can be pierced and how this itself can be integral to the drawing process. Piercing allows light to pass through from one side of a drawing to the other. It can both interrupt and disturb its surface.  It hovers somewhere between creativity and damage. A form of scarification. Repetitious piercing can unify the plane.

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The Claude Glass / Polarities of dark and light

‘Polarities of dark and light. Eye of the ocean, the light we see….’ – These words were written to introduce a series of my works shown at Inverleith House, Edinburgh in 1995 – works that explored the ethereal qualities of salt and clear water pools lying along the Coromandel Coast of Southern India.Over ten years later I find myself looking again and again into another kind of pool – not the white encrusted surface of an indentation in the sands, but rather the handheld pool of a black concave mirror.

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Thinking of Harry Parkes

Boarding a train bound for Shiroko, I was thinking about Harry Parkes. It was late April and this was one of several journeys that I made to different parts of rural Japan earlier this year in order to see some extraordinary processes connected with handmade paper – processes which radically change the physicality of paper, some which render it waterproof, others which leave it soft and malleable like cloth.

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