Art School Drawings from the 19th Century

Art education in 19th-century Britain was shaped by four London-based organisations: the Royal Academy Schools, the Government Schools of Design, the Department of Science and Art (based in this museum) and the Slade School of Art. Each was driven by powerful ideologies which dictated students' training.

These drawings, by students and teachers, reflect the different principles and practices of each school. They also reveal more general changes in emphasis over the 19th century. As subject matter, antique sculpture was gradually replaced by depictions of un-idealised human figures. Stylistically, the earlier insistence on a high level of technical finish gave way to a more spontaneous, sketchy kind of drawing.


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Seventeenth-Century Women's Dress Patterns: Book One

Seventeenth-Century Women's Dress Patterns: Book One

This innovative and breathtakingly detailed book from the V&A's fashion collections presents dress patterns, construction details, embroidery and …

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Event - Architects as Artists

Sat 15 November 2014–Sun 29 March 2015

DISPLAY: Why do architects create art? From the Renaissance to the 20th century architects have recorded buildings for study and pleasure, to document their travels and supplement their income. Drawing was also considered an important tool to educate students in their knowledge of historic buildings, and necessary to prepare presentation drawings for clients.

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