Art School Drawings from the 19th Century

Art education in 19th-century Britain was shaped by four London-based organisations: the Royal Academy Schools, the Government Schools of Design, the Department of Science and Art (based in this museum) and the Slade School of Art. Each was driven by powerful ideologies which dictated students' training.

These drawings, by students and teachers, reflect the different principles and practices of each school. They also reveal more general changes in emphasis over the 19th century. As subject matter, antique sculpture was gradually replaced by depictions of un-idealised human figures. Stylistically, the earlier insistence on a high level of technical finish gave way to a more spontaneous, sketchy kind of drawing.


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The Art of Drawing (Hardcover)||RHFPR

The Art of Drawing (Hardcover)||RHFPR

The Art of Drawing is the first book in sixty years to cover the wider history of drawing in Britain exploring the crucial role drawing has played in …

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International Training Course

The Victoria and Albert Museum welcomes applications for ‘Creating Innovative Learning Programmes’, its new one week intensive course. This is a unique training opportunity for museum professionals from overseas who are interested in attracting and programming for a range of museum audiences.

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Event - Captain Linnaeus Tripe: Photographer of India and Burma, 1852-1860

Wed 24 June 2015–Sun 11 October 2015

EXHIBITION: This captivating exhibition of the pioneering 19th-century British photographer Captain Linnaeus Tripe features over 60 of his most striking views of Indian and Burmese landscape and architecture, taken between 1852-1860.

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