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Before an object is accepted by the V&A it must go through an approvals process which considers whether the V&A is the right place for the object to be and how it will need to be looked after. There must be a reason for accepting each object that becomes part of the collection.

Once an object has been accepted its condition is checked by a conservator, who assesses the state the object is in and carries out any work necessary to stabilise the object's condition.

Each object is then given a museum number and a basic catalogue record is created for it so that all the information known about the object is kept together and linked to the object by its number. All the research done about an object is put into this record and all further research done in the future will be added to it.

The object is often photographed at this stage, so that images of it will be available to the public and researchers.

A suitable display space in a gallery is then found. Any special conditions needed for the safe installation and display of the object are assessed by conservators and the technical services installation team. A curator researches and writes labels or other interpretation to inform visitors about the object. The object can then be installed in the gallery and viewed by visitors.

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Theatrical Scene by Utagawa Kunisada l (Mounted Print)||EVAEX

Theatrical Scene by Utagawa Kunisada l (Mounted Print)||EVAEX

Theatrical scene from Jiraiya Goketsu Monogatari. Utagawa Kunisada l (1786–1865) Woodblock print Japan, 1852. The V&A's collection of ukiyo…

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Game: Luxury Time

Are you worthy? Do you have the skill and focus to take on our challenge of making three luxury objects in our online game?

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Event - Curator Talk: Bejewelled Treasures: The Al-Thani Collection

Fri 20 November 2015 16:30–17:30

Join the curators of ‘Bejewelled Treasures’ for an introduction to this exhibition, which explores the broad themes of tradition and modernity in Indian jewellery through the display of spectacular objects drawn from a single collection. The talk will provide insights into the curators’ approach to the subject by highlighting specific objects from the exhibition, such as Mughal jades and a rare jewelled gold finial from the throne of Tipu Sultan, as well as pieces that demonstrate the strong influence of India on European jewellery design in the early twentieth century.

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