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Wearables In our family, there is a tradition of creating wearable quilts such as the jacket and bathrobe presented here. As a girl, my bathrobe was always made from scraps of fabric my mother had left over after sewing my clothes. The jacket is one of two which I made, one for me and one for my daughter. The color pattern was the rainbow spectrum and each square comes from a piece of cloth from a meaningful piece of clothing. The jacket tells a story in many colors. The bathrobe was one of the last made in our family. Each side of the garment has matching patches of cloth. Quilts were made for utility, and these items which are worn, are made for that reason--usefulness.
 
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Quilts by Bridget These quilts were created by Bridget T. Robbins. She has been quilting since she was six years old. She creates her own designs as well as using materials that are handy. She makes the quilts as gifts for wedding anniversaries and other gifts.
 
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Pineapple Quilt This quilt was made by my grandmother, Victoria Gagnon St. Germain Daigle, in Wallagrass a small town in northern Maine. The quilt has one square where the fabric does not match because she ran out of the white she was working with in making the quilt. The legend of quilts states that a different piece of fabric is added to the quilt in recognition that the creating spirit is the only perfection that exists. My mother was going to repair this square, but she never did and I do not wish to change the quilt at all. I write about these quilts in my book, Wednesday's Child, that I see as a word quilt in recognition of all the women's lives who make life whole from many pieces.
 
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Cathedral Window This quilt was made by my mother who began studying the pattern of how to make this quilt in the 1960s when she saw a picture of the Cathedral Window quilt in a magazine. She worked as a tailor and was an expert seamstress. She worked on the quilt during the late 70s and completed the quilt, signed Rita Cote, 1980, just before she passed away. Each window of fabric comes from a piece of cloth of clothes that she sewed for our entire family. The quilt is like a story board of events in our lives--baby clothes, marriages, play clothes, curtains, bedspreads, shirts for my brothers and more. The quilt came to be mine when my mother passed away.