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The Enchanted Castle title
Link to 'Robber Baron' table info Link to 'Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friend 1' lantern info Link to 'Heatwave' radiator info Link to Pixelated chair info Link to 'Venus and Mars' chair and mirror info Link to 'Clone' chair info Link to 'Smoke' mirror info Link to 'Cinderella' table info Link to 'Robber Baron' cabinet info Link to 'Lathe Chair VIII' info Link to 'The Pyramids of Makkum' tulip vase info Link to 'The Pyramids of Makkum' tulip vase info Link to 'The Pyramids of Makkum' tulip vase info Link to 'The Pyramids of Makkum' tulip vase info Link to 'George III' chest of drawers info Link to 'Robber Baron' mantel clock info Link to 'Robber Baron' standing lamp info Link to 'Robber Baron' jewel safe info

 

We now enter an Enchanted Castle furnished with marvellous and fantastical objects. Many recall designs from the 18th century, a period that was frequently evoked by later writers and illustrators of fairytales. The 18th century was also the age of the rise of the novel, a new way to tell tales. Early novels, such as Daniel Defoe's Moll Flanders (1722), were descriptions of the material world of Georgian life, as were William Hogarth's print series, such as Marriage à la Mode (1745). In both, style and design were a visual language that indicated social and worldly status. Here we see conventional displays of high status parodied and subverted, through awkward changes of scale or seemingly inappropriate uses of materials.
 
Travel to The Forest Glade here. Travel to Heaven and Hell here