The front of Sir Paul Pindar’s House, London

The front of Sir Paul Pindar’s House, London

This is the front of Sir Paul Pindar's house in Bishopsgate. It is one of the finest specimens of timber-framed domestic architecture in London and was constructed about 1600 by a wealthy London merchant. Paul Pindar went to Venice in 1584, at the age of 18, and over the next 14 years he amassed a vast fortune that helped him build this new house. Later he became ambassador to Turkey and was knighted by James I.

The two-storey façade was originally four stories. It is made of jointed and carved oak with richly carved panels at the bottom of each bay on the first and second floors. Above this are windows made up of many small pieces of glass. Glass was an expensive material at the time and its use signified the wealth and status of the house owner.

By 1787 the house had become a public house and in 1890 it was demolished to make way for the enlargement of Liverpool Street Station. The Great Eastern Railway Company then gave part of the façade to the V&A.