The Triumphant Entry of Christ into Jerusalem

The Triumphant Entry of Christ into Jerusalem

Commissioned from Rosario Riolo at a cost of £324 1s 1d in 1869

Original:

The Triumphant Entry of Christ into Jerusalem
Unidentified Venetian sculptor
1140-50
Marble
Capella Palatina in the Royal Palace, Palermo, Italy

This scene forms part of the New Testament cycle in the North and South transepts of the Cappella Palatina on the South wall of the south transept. The Capella Palatina was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily, erected during the reign of Roger II (1105-54) by about 1132-40, with superb mosaic decoration extending into the second half of the 12th century. The mosaics have undergone several campaigns of restoration, and the Entry into Jerusalem was among the scenes to suffer during the 19th century at the hand of Rosario Riolo according to Otto Demus (The Mosaics of Norman Sicily, London, 1949, p. 36). The same Rosario Riolo was also responsible for this copy, executed between 1869-70, which therefore can be considered a faithful replica of the original.

This scene forms part of the New Testament cycle in the North and South transepts of the Cappella Palatina on the South wall of the south transept. The Capella Palatina was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily, erected during the reign of Roger II (1105-54) by about 1132-40, with superb mosaic decoration extending into the second half of the 12th century. The mosaics have undergone several campaigns of restoration, and the Entry into Jerusalem was among the scenes to suffer during the 19th century at the hand of Rosario Riolo according to Otto Demus (The Mosaics of Norman Sicily, London, 1949, p. 36). The same Rosario Riolo was also responsible for this copy, executed between 1869-70, which therefore can be considered a faithful replica of the original.