'Crawford's 4 o'Clock Afternoon Tea Biscuits', 1928. Museum no. E.1701-1983

'Crawford's 4 o'Clock Afternoon Tea Biscuits', 1928. Museum no. E.1701-1983

'Crawford's 4 o'Clock Afternoon Tea Biscuits'
1928
Biscuit tin label
Museum no. E.1701-1983
Given by M.J. Franklin

Advertising imagery and packaging can reveal a great deal about lifestyles. Taking afternoon tea was a long-established custom for the middle-class woman. It was a social occasion and an opportunity to entertain friends or to go out, perhaps to a tea-shop or an hotel.

A proper afternoon tea would include sandwiches, as well as scones, cakes or biscuits. Home-baking was an important part of a woman's domestic duties but an increasing number of shop-bought convenience foods were available.

There were no supermarkets at this date. Most food shopping was done at specialist retailers, which were to be found in every High Street - butchers, bakers, greengrocers, fishmongers and grocers. Grocers sold dry goods such as flour, sugar, tea and so on, as well as eggs, cheese, cold meats, and packaged goods such as biscuits.

This print can be found in Prints and Drawings Study Room box EDUC 5.