'Quite too utterly utter' songsheet, England

'Quite too utterly utter' songsheet, England

Songsheet: 'Quite too utterly utter'
Written and composed by Robert Coote
Princess Theatre
English
1881
Colour lithograph (signed Alfred Concanen)
Museum no. S.34-1993
© Victoria & Albert Museum, London

Songsheet 'Quite Too Utterly Utter; A New Aesthetic Roundelay' showing an image of a long-haired artistic man in a velvet jacket, a soft-collared shirt with a necktie, his hands clasped, singing the praises of two large octagonal vases with large plants one of which is a sunflower. The song satirises the Aesthetic Movement of the 1880`s.

Artistic men also wore velvet, which was only worn in fashionable circles for informal garments such as smoking jackets and caps. This style of dress was satirized in Gilbert and Sullivan's opera 'Patience', first produced in 1881. It poked fun at the attitudes of the aesthetes whilst at the same time showing the public the beauty of their art and dress, and promoting the store Liberty in the printed programme. The costumes were all made from Liberty fabric.