Coloured plate, The English Woman's Domestic Magazine

Coloured plate, The English Woman's Domestic Magazine

Print: The English Woman's Domestic Magazine: an illustrated journal combining practical information, instruction and amusement.
England
July 1860
Coloured engraving
Museum no. PP.19.F
© Victoria & Albert Museum, London

Fashion plate showing two fashionably dressed women in brightly striped crinoline dresses.

In 1852, publishing entrepreneur Samuel Beeton launched 'The English Woman's Domestic Magazine' at the startlingly low price of 2d a copy. An instant success, it had achieved a circulation of 50,000 by 1860 and became the `blueprint for the modern magazine industry'. It appealed to the rapidly- expanding middle-class sector who relished the mix of fiction, fashion and food, the latter provided by Beeton's wife, the soon-to-be lionised Isabella. Isabella visited Paris regularly and acquired fashion plates from Adolphe Goubaud's Moniteur de la Mode. A feature of Beeton's magazine was the "Practical Dress Instructor," a forerunner of the paper dressmaking pattern. In 1861, Beeton followed up his success with 'The Queen', a weekly newspaper of more topical character.