Taquete fragment

Taquete fragment

Taquete fragment (Textiles - Room 98, Case 3)
Central Asia
200-400 AD
Weft-faced compound weave in wool
Length 32 cm x width 18 cm
Museum no. LOAN:STEIN.596 (L.A.IV.004)
© Victoria and Albert Museum, London
On loan from Government of India and the Archaeological Survey of India

The majority of the textiles discovered within the walled garrison town of Loulan were made of wool. This is a fragment of patterned wool, called taquete, which is a weft-faced compound plain weave and due to its sturdiness might have been used as furnishing. This weave might have been an imitation of jin silk, a warp-faced compound silk produced in China. Some scholars suggest that these types of woollen weaves were made in the Western Regions along the Silk Road, most probably in Bactria or Gandhara.