Dusty Springfield

Dusty Springfield

After some success in the early 1960s with country music trio The Springfields, with her brother Tom, Dusty Springfield hit the big time when she went solo and made her way to the heart of Swinging London. Her almost caricatured appearance - thick, thick mascara and a stack of peroxided hair - seemed to be worn to mask the shy, self-critical girl within. But everything was revealed in her voice, which she used to communicate a world of fragile emotion. She could tackle the rawness of rhythm and blues, the smooth sophistication of a Broadway standard, or the simplicity of classic pop. Hits including You Don't Have to Say You Love Me (which went to number four in the US) and Son of a Preacher Man cemented her reputation as 'the first white woman of soul'.

But the constant search for perfection drove her into a spiral of drug and alcohol abuse. She fought back, and a 1987 collaboration with the Pet Shop Boys, and her soundtrack for the film Scandal a year later re-established her career. In 1998 she received the OBE, but lost her battle with cancer the following year.