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King Alfred the Great?

By Stuart Frost

Reliquary Cross, about 1000. Museum no. 7943-1862.It is the nature of history that only the names of a comparatively few people are remembered after their deaths. For the medieval period the people we know most about tend to be the most powerful, exceptional or notorious figures. 

Medieval chroniclers were fond of adding an adjective after an individual’s name. Some rulers were more fortunate than others in the label posterity gave them. Charles the Great, William the Conqueror and Richard the Lion Heart are all at the acceptable end of the spectrum, but who would want to be known as Louis the Fat, Charles the Bald or John Soft-sword?

The word great is arguably over-used today. Such and such is a great singer, footballer or actor. It is difficult to really assess someone’s merits without the perspective that the passage of time brings. However if there is one English figure who truly deserves the epithet great then it is Alfred of Wessex (849-899), ruler of the only Anglo-Saxon kingdom to survive the Viking onslaught in the ninth century. 

If you need convincing about Alfred’s credentials then I’d recommend visiting Winchester to see the exhibition: Alfred the Great: Warfare, Wealth and Wisdom. The exhibition closes on 27 April 2008. The display is small but it includes some beautiful objects which are also of immense historical importance. The V&A has loaned the remarkable Anglo-Saxon reliquary illustrated above to Winchester for the duration of the display. Click on the object to find out more about the object and its link with Alfred’s achievements.

The legacy Alfred left his sucessors allowed them to consolidate the Anglo-Saxon kingdom and eventually bring all of England under the control of one monarch. The origins of modern England can arguably be traced back to Alfred’s reign. Winchester became Alfred’s main city and throughout the middle ages the city was extremely important. There is enough evidence around the modern town to give a sense of just how impressive medieval Winchester was.

Alfred’s achievements ensured that he would never be forgotten. The photograph illustrated below shows 19th century remodelling at Arundel Castle. The relief sculpture is difficult to see but it shows ‘King Alfred instituting Trial by Jury on Salisbury Plain’, evidence of Alfred’s enduring reputation as a model monarch.North Side of Quadrangle, Arundel Castle, 1852-54, Benjamin Brecknell Turner. Museum no. PH 44 1982

Click here to find out more about Alfred the Great: Warfare, Wealth and Wisdom.

2 Responses to “King Alfred the Great?”

  1. sabrina Says:

    I have done my family tree, on my grandmothers mothers side, and have found that she was a direct descendant from King Alfred The Great, he would be her great great, etc grandfather, I have double checked the dates, names and marriages, but I was wondering if you might know of a more efficient way of making sure the times people and dates were correct? My family tree on her side right now is not finished or even close, it is about 94 pages long using windows office pro, I was also wondering knowing that there is quite the possibility that she descends from this family, should I take further action, or prepare legal advise? Thank you for you’re time, and I look forward to hearing you’re response. I know with it being quite a few centuries ago, I cant place my hopes up there too high, but the excitement and the journey of finding out is all worth while. Have a nice day.

  2. Frost Stuart Says:

    Hi Sabrina,

    Thanks for posting such a fascinating comment. I’m afraid I don’t have much experience of tracing familiy trees so I can’t help very much. The National Archives at Kew do deal with a lot of these queries and they may be able to you with your research. You can find more information online via the following link:

    www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/familyhistory/

    I’d be interested to know what the outcome of your work is.

    Good luck!

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