Bangle

Friedrich Becker trained as an engine fitter and aeronautical engineer before becoming a jeweller.

In this bangle he explored the combination of synthetic stones with stainless steel. These materials had for him a contemporary feel as products of our modern era. The synthetic sapphire was cut to his specification. Becker was adamant that ‘even the layman should be able to recognise that it is a synthetic stone’.

Bangle

 

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Bangle

Düsseldorf, 1988
Designed and made by Friedrich Becker (1922-97)
Stainless steel and synthetic sapphire
V&A: M.23-1991

Friedrich Becker standing in his kinetic room

 

For Becker movement was the ‘only stable thing’. He experimented with kinetics throughout his career. When a visitor entered this room, formerly a part of his studio, sculptures, objects and jewels would magically begin to move.

Between 1964 to 1982 Becker was professor at the Düsseldorf University of Applied Sciences. He had his first major solo exhibition at the Goldsmiths’ Company in London in 1966.

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Friedrich Becker standing in his kinetic room

Düsseldorf, early 1990s
Photograph

By courtesy of Hilde Becker, Düsseldorf

 

Becker was best known for his trademark kinetic jewellery. Its amazing visual effects and illusions were made possible through ‘the principle of integrated unbalance’ using concealed micro-ball bearings and weights. Only a slight movement of the hand sets the piece into motion.

Becker was a prolific jeweller and developed over 500 ring designs.

Ring

 

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Ring

Düsseldorf, 1993
Designed and made by Friedrich Becker (1922-97)
Stainless steel and synthetic sapphire

Touch the ring to see the kinetic effect.
Private collection.