Welcome (back) to Twin Peaks


Learning and Interpretation
October 6, 2014

Surely not! After all this time, countless cups of damn good joe and plates of cherry pie, it’s happening again…

David Lynch and Mark Frost‘s cult series set in the sleepy town of Twin Peaks, a place where “…a yellow light means slow down, not go faster”, is set for a return in 2016, a whole 25 years after the original series aired. The show stretched genres, ranging from horror and thriller to kitsch teen romance and surreal comedy, and visually, it collected influences from Americana, Native American art, fifties rock and roll and the contemporary styles of the nineties.

If Lynch and Frost are looking for any further inspiration for the new series, then what better place to start than the V&A’s galleries and archives?

Here are a few things from the collections that look right at home in Twin Peaks. If you would like to add in your own choices, take a look through our catalogue and let us know in the comments!

 

Samuel Bourne, 1886 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London
“Waterfall Cascades on the Scinde”, Samuel Bourne, 1886 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

 

"Log Table #1", Fredrikson Stallard, 2002 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London
“Log Table #1”, Fredrikson Stallard, 2002 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

 

Untitled, Jean Peschard, Twentieth Century © Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Untitled, Jean Peschard, Twentieth Century © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

 

Hand knitted wool jumper, Unknown Maker, 1942 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Hand knitted wool jumper, Unknown Maker, 1942 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

 

"The Boughton Bed", 1670 - 1697 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London
“The Boughton Bed”, 1670 – 1697 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

 

"The Meeting Place", Paul Nash, 1922 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London
“The Meeting Place”, Paul Nash, 1922 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

 

Armchair, H.F.C Rampendahl, ca. 1860 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Armchair, H.F.C Rampendahl, ca. 1860 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

 

Coppice (King's Wood), Gerhard Stromberg, 1994 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Coppice (King’s Wood), Gerhard Stromberg, 1994 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

 

Brooch, Mitchell Maer, 1950 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Brooch, Mitchell Maer, 1950 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

 

Ensemble, Helen David English Eccentrics, 1996 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Ensemble, Helen David English Eccentrics, 1996 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

 

Photograph, Francis Frith, made 1850 - 1870 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Photograph, Francis Frith, made 1850 – 1870 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

 

Television, Pye Limited, 1957 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Television, Pye Limited, 1957 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

 

Any more suggestions? Let us know in the comments below…

About the author

Learning and Interpretation
October 6, 2014

I'm Team Leader for Digital Programmes at the V&A and run events, workshops, talks and festivals with artists and designers who use and experiment with digital tools, processes and manufacturing.

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