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John Tweed (1869–1933) was born in Glasgow and trained in the London studio of Hamo Thornycroft, while also attending the Royal Academy Schools. In June 1893 he went to Paris in the hope of studying with Rodin, but he found the four-year commitment that Rodin demanded of his pupils more than he could undertake.

On returning to London, he became associated with Alfred Stevens and other exponents of the New Sculpture movement.

Later, he carried out a number of large-scale public commissions, including monuments for British leaders such as Sir Robert Clive and Earl Kitchener.

Over the years he maintained his friendship and admiration for Rodin, and championed his work in Britain. He was largely responsible for negotiating the loan of Rodin's sculptures to the V&A in 1914, and shortly afterwards the gift.

On Rodin's death in 1917, it was Tweed who loyally organised a memorial service at St Margaret's, Westminster, for admirers who were not able to travel to Meudon for his funeral on account of the war.

John Tweed, 'Mother and Child', after 1893. Museum no. A.27-2005

John Tweed, 'Mother and Child', after 1893. Museum no. A.27-2005

John Tweed, 'Auguste Rodin', about 1902. Museum no. A.29-1924

John Tweed, 'Auguste Rodin', about 1902. Museum no. A.29-1924

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