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Teddy bears are much loved toys and comforters, but in the course of being cuddled and played with they become soiled and damaged. Ears are torn, paws worn away; they become distorted and grubby. Because of their importance to their owners they are not usually discarded and replaced like worn out clothes; their lives are extended through darning, patching and other home repairs. Some teddy bears are passed onto subsequent generations where they suffer further wear and tear.

In a museum their purpose changes; they become objects in a collection, in this instance at the Bethnal Green Museum of Childhood.

Conservation of these teddy bears involved removing the old repairs - some of which had distorted the original form, and maintaining all that remained of the original object. (Of course if the object had an important provenance it may have been that the repairs were of interest too).They were cleaned and returned to their original shapes.

Click on the images below for larger versions and further details.

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William Morris 'Cray' Silk Scarf||EVAEX

William Morris 'Cray' Silk Scarf||EVAEX

This timeless silk scarf is printed with one of William Morris's most well known designs. Entitled "Cray" and originally dating from 1884, t…

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The Fabric of India

03 October 2015 – 10 January 2016. The highlight of the V&A’s India Festival, this will be the first major exhibition to explore the dynamic and multifaceted world of handmade textiles from India from the 3rd to the 21st century.

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Event - Red House - Tour 2

Tue 08 March 2016 14:00–15:30

Red House is an ongoing conservation project. The house team will talk you through the work they are doing to uncover the collaborative decorative schemes created by the Pre-Raphaelite circle in the house that Philip Webb designed for his best friend William Morris “to be jolly in”.

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