We have launched a new website and are reviewing this page. Find out more
Open daily 10.00 to 17.45 Admission free Menu

Men's court dress: Russia 1720s-1917

Until the reign of Peter the Great (Peter I, ruled 1682–1725) Russia was isolated from Europe. Peter then introduced many western institutions and practices. His dress reforms replaced traditional Russian clothing with European fashions, or ‘Saxon and French’ fashion as it was called in Russia.

The coronations

Coronation heralds, 1797

The five Russian chivalric orders, the dress of four of which are shown below,were established in the European tradition, and membership was by noble birth or as a reward for service. Each order celebrated the feast day of the saint to whom it was dedicated. This brought together all the members of the order, honouring their fellowship with church ceremonies, a formal dinner and a ball.

Each chivalric order had its heralds who served as messengers for their order’s ceremonies and imperial coronations. From 1724, there were also special coronation heralds who proclaimed the new emperor throughout Moscow and led the coronation procession, wearing distinctive and colourful costumes. Paul I reformed Russia’s system of chivalric orders, restoring and standardising their dress, as well as the uniforms of other court officials.

Dress of the Herald of the Order of St Andrew, 1797. Museum no. TK-1658, TK2561/1-2, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Dress of the Herald of the Order of St Andrew, 1797. Museum no. TK-1658, TK2561/1-2, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Tabard of the Herald of the Order of St Anna, Johann Kolb and Maria Österreich, 1797, Museum no. TK-1653, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Tabard of the Herald of the Order of St Anna, Johann Kolb and Maria Österreich, 1797, Museum no. TK-1653, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Tunic for a Knight of the Order of St George, 1798, Museum no. TK-298, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Tunic for a Knight of the Order of St George, 1798, Museum no. TK-298, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Tabard and hat for the Herald of the Order of St Catherine, Johann Kolb, Fedot Vonchakov and Maria Österreich, 1797. Museum no. TK-1663, TK-1566, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Tabard and hat for the Herald of the Order of St Catherine, Johann Kolb, Fedot Vonchakov and Maria Österreich, 1797. Museum no. TK-1663, TK-1566, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

 

 

Uniform of the Chief Master of Ceremonies, 1797, Museum no. TK-1682, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Uniform of the Chief Master of Ceremonies, 1797, Museum no. TK-1682, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

The coronation of Paul I, 1797

Paul I, son of Peter III and Catherine the Great, came to the throne in 1796 after his mother’s long reign. For his coronation, he wore a uniform that he had designed himself in the style of Prussian military uniform. The day after his coronation, the emperor ordered all the imperial regiments including the two life guards regiments, Semenovsky and Preobrazhensky, to adopt the same style.

Paul I was the first Russian emperor to wear military uniform at his coronation. His interest in uniforms was echoed by Great Britain’s Prince of Wales (the future King George IV), who was colonel of several regiments and collected uniforms. When Napoleon Bonaparte became Emperor of France in 1802, he began to wear his army uniform for everyday dress.

Coronation uniform of Paul I, 1796, Museum no.TK-3018, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Coronation uniform of Paul I, 1796, Museum no.TK-3018, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Coronation uniform of Paul I, 1796. Museum no. TK-3018, TK-1552, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Coronation uniform of Paul I, 1796. Museum no. TK-3018, TK-1552, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

The Coronation of Alexander I, 1801

Hat from the Coronation uniform of Alexander I, 1801, Museum no.TK-2748, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Hat from the Coronation uniform of Alexander I, 1801, Museum no.TK-2748, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

 

Alexander I came to the throne in 1801 after the assassination of his father, Paul I. He had been given a liberal education at the court of his grandmother Catherine the Great and once he became emperor he modernised many aspects of Russian society.

Like his father, Alexander was fascinated by military uniform. He designed new ones for Russian regiments and wore the uniform of the Preobrazhensky Regiment for his coronation.

A courtier noted that ‘the Emperor’s court came to resemble soldiers’ barracks. The emperor’s office was full of orderlies, messengers and lance-corporals modelling the uniforms of various troops, and the emperor would spend hours with them, making chalk marks on their tunics and undergarments amidst samples of moustache brushes, boot brushes, button-polishing boards and other similar sundries.’

Snuffbox with a portrait of Peter III, 1754–61, Museum no. MZ-4129, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Snuffbox with a portrait of Peter III, 1754–61, Museum no. MZ-4129, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Dmitry Ivanovich Evreinov, Miniature portrait of Alexander I, 1802–4, Museum no. MP-9065, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Dmitry Ivanovich Evreinov, Miniature portrait of Alexander I, 1802–4, Museum no. MP-9065, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

The coronation of Nicholas I & Alexander II, 1825 and 1855

Nicholas I came to the throne after the death of his brother Alexander I in 1825 and was succeeded by his son Alexander II in 1855.

Both father and son were generals. They participated in Russian military campaigns before and during their reigns, including the Napoleonic invasion and foreign wars of 1812–14, and the Crimean War of 1853–6. By wearing military uniform for their coronations, they emphasised the emperor’s role as Russia’s military leader.

In his choice of coronation uniform Nicholas showed the continuity between the preceding reign and his own. Alexander then introduced a series of reforms in the interests of simplicity and comfort. He gave the name of a Russian garment, the polucaftan, to the new skirted coat already being worn in Western Europe, thus underlining his policy of ‘official nationalism’, which called attention to Russia’s history.

Coronation sash of Nicholas I, 1826, Museum no. TK-1916/1-2, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Coronation sash of Nicholas I, 1826, Museum no. TK-1916/1-2, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Helmet from the Coronation uniform of Alexander II, 1855, Museum no. TK-1558, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Helmet from the Coronation uniform of Alexander II, 1855, Museum no. TK-1558, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Boots from the Coronation uniform of Alexander II, 1855, Museum no. TK-1558, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Boots from the Coronation uniform of Alexander II, 1855, Museum no. TK-1558, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Coronation uniform of Alexander II, 1855, Museum no. TK-1988, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Coronation uniform of Alexander II, 1855, Museum no. TK-1988, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Coronation coat of Alexander III, 1883, Museum no. TK-3039, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Coronation coat of Alexander III, 1883, Museum no. TK-3039, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

The Coronation of Alexander III, 1883

Alexander III, second son of Alexander II, came to the throne in 1881 after the assassination of his father. He left behind a successful military career, having commanded the guards’ units and troops of St Petersburg, and headed a detachment of 40,000 men in the Russo-Turkish War of 1877–8. He was awarded the Cross of St George for exceptional military service and personal courage in battle.

Alexander encouraged simplicity in the dress of the Russian people. He was a role model for his subjects, wearing uniform when attending receptions and balls and also for his coronation ceremony in 1883. Wanting the uniform of the Russian army to resemble Russian national costume as closely as possible, he designed this new uniform. But in contrast with the splendid dress worn by the rest of his household, it appeared gloomy in colour and crude in cut.

The Coronation of Nicholas II, 1896

‘And what a glorious day it was – a cloudless sky with hardly breeze enough to stir a leaf, while the hot sun poured upon the many gilded cupolas of Moscow and the Kremlin till they gleamed like fire.’ Even the weather played its part perfectly for the coronation of Nicholas II, according to The Times newspaper correspondent. Given a privileged seat for a good view, he described it as ‘certainly the most gorgeous and perhaps the most impressive ceremony that I have ever witnessed’.

Nicholas II was the last emperor to succeed to the throne and his coronation in 1896 was the last in Russian history. It was also exceptionally splendid, and because the regalia – the textiles, religious vestments and court livery – were preserved in the Moscow Armouries, they survived the upheaval of the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917.

Presentation cloth, 1896, Museum no.TK-719, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Presentation cloth, 1896, Museum no.TK-719, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Coronation uniform coat, 1896, Museum no. TK-3040, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Coronation uniform coat, 1896, Museum no. TK-3040, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Peter II, postilions & fancy dress

The wardrobe of Peter II, 1727-30

European fashions continued to be worn at the Russian court of Peter II, grandson of Peter the Great. Although Peter II ruled for less than three years (1727–30), his wardrobe is well represented in the Kremlin collections. It includes western-style suits and underwear, as well as some informal garments retaining the influence of traditional Russian dress.

Most of these clothes were made in France, as Russia had not yet developed the tailoring and textile-making expertise required to make western fashions. Many of the fabrics – silks, wools and linens – were imported from well known European textile manufacturing centres.

Peter II was only 14 when he died and the variation in the sizes of his clothes show the growth of an adolescent boy. Some of his clothes appear barely worn, while other garments, like his mourning coats and hunting clothes were much used and mended.

 

Postilions' and Coachmen's Livery, 1825–1917

Masquerade costume of Nicholas II, 1903, Museum no.TK-2922, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Masquerade costume of Nicholas II, 1903, Museum no.TK-2922, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

All ranks of imperial servants wore livery, or court uniform. The postilions and coachmen, whose livery is shown here, accompanied the emperor’s entourage on formal outings, either riding on horseback or driving the imperial carriages.

Court livery included both relatively plain garments for day-to-day use and the sumptuous uniforms worn for particularly grand occasions. Apart from coronations, these special events included the celebration of saints’ days, the consecration of churches, the reviewing of troops and the meeting of a new royal bride.

The carriages, stables, personnel and uniforms were the responsibility of the Court Stable Department. Inscriptions and labels on the linings of some garments suggest that the department employed both Russians and foreigners to make the liveries. New designs had to be approved by the emperor himself.

In 1903, Nicholas II and Empress Alexandra organised a special fancy dress ball. They invited the aristocracy to attend in Russian dress of the 17th century, prompting renewed interest in Russian history and traditional garments.

Coachman’s jacket, 1881–1917, Museum no. TK-3054, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Coachman’s jacket, 1881–1917, Museum no. TK-3054, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Postilion's jacket, 1825-1855, Museum no.TK-1874, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Postilion's jacket, 1825-1855, Museum no.TK-1874, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

The guests commissioned their costumes from important tailoring and dressmaking workshops in Moscow and St Petersburg, especially from the studios of St Petersburg’s imperial theatres. The imperial family employed the director of the imperial Hermitage and former director of the imperial theatres to design their costumes.

The Russian ball was so exclusive and impressive an event that many remembered it as the last ball in Russia’s history. One commentator described it as a true fairytale, with a ‘profusion of traditional national costumes, richly decorated with rare furs, magnificent diamonds, pearls and semi-precious stones, most in their original settings. The family jewels were out in an abundance that exceeded all expectations.’

Gold & silver

Gold and silver have been admired and desired by peoples of all cultures throughout human history. The development of metal-working tools and skills allowed both these precious metals to be shaped and polished for personal adornment in the form of jewellery and dress, and domestic wares. Gold and silver’s eye-catching gleam, the rarity of their ores, and the labour and expense of refining and working them mean that these materials signify social status and wealth in all societies.

Gunpowder flask of Peter III, 1728-1762, Museum no.OR-2244, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums
Gunpowder flask of Peter III, 1728-1762, Museum no.OR-2244, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums
Pocket telescope, Museum no.TK-1429, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums
Pocket telescope, Museum no.TK-1429, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

The most gold and silver traditionally belonged to the monarch, whose garments and possessions lavishly displayed these precious metals. In courts around the world, crowns, sceptres, orbs and maces, plate and a wide range of domestic wares are fashioned of gold and silver. Jewellery is also made of these metals and they are embroidered on and woven into the fabrics of royal robes and other clothing, so the garments shimmer in the light. Not only did royal families wear gold and silver, but their servants, soldiers and retinue were also splendidly outfitted with gleaming uniforms.

Gold and silver feature prominently in the regalia of the Russian Imperial Court. Even practical objects such as a gunpowder flask and telescope are embellished with jewels and precious metals.

Costume of the Herald of Alexander Neva, 1797, Museum no.TK-1647, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Costume of the Herald of Alexander Neva, 1797, Museum no.TK-1647, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Working gold and silver into or onto fabrics is a very old art. Fine wires of metal thread were woven into textiles as early as 3,000 BC. Wrapping very thin sheets of either gold or silver around a core thread of linen or silk created a more durable and flexible yarn to use in weaving or embroidery. In Europe, this technique has been in use for over 3,000 years to create cloth of gold and cloth of silver. Both are used for the most important royal occasions, coronations and weddings, in many societies.

Gold and silver also represent material purity, a quality valued in religious ceremonies. In the Christian church, both metals are used for communion vessels and traditionally all surfaces in contact with consecrated wine and bread had to be gold. Religious vestments are made of symbolic colours and richly adorned with embroidery and braid in precious metals. At royal coronations, the vestments of the priests or clergymen who carry out the ceremony of crowning and blessing are as formal and lavish as the monarch’s robes. The phelonion is one of the principle garments worn by priests in the Russian Orthodox Church.

Threads wrapped in gold and silver can also be woven on narrow looms to create a wide variety of braids. These are then sewn to garments, over seams, around hemlines and other edges of fabric. Metal braid is used in court livery and military uniform for embellishment and to distinguish one rank or group from another.

Gold thread woven phelonion, 1896, A. & V. Sapozhnikovy, Museum no.TK-161, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Gold thread woven phelonion, 1896, A. & V. Sapozhnikovy, Museum no.TK-161, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

 

Coronation suit of Peter II, 1727, Museum no.TK-1935, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Coronation suit of Peter II, 1727, Museum no.TK-1935, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Threads wrapped in gold and silver can also be woven on narrow looms to create a wide variety of braids. These are then sewn to garments, over seams, around hemlines and other edges of fabric. Metal braid is used in court livery and military uniform for embellishment and to distinguish one rank or group from another.

In Imperial Russia, there were five chivalric orders whose membership was by noble birth or as a reward for service. The heralds for each order served as messengers for their order’s ceremonies and imperial coronations, wearing colourful and distinctive uniforms decorated with gold and silver braid.

Coronation uniform of Alexander II, 1855, Museum no. TK-1788, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Coronation uniform of Alexander II, 1855, Museum no. TK-1788, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Coronation uniform of Emperor Alexander I, 1801, Museum no. TK-3020, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Coronation uniform of Emperor Alexander I, 1801, Museum no. TK-3020, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

When plaited in a circular form, gold and silver braids are often looped around a garment rather than attached by sewing.

As well as being woven into fabrics and braids, gold and silver-covered threads were used for embroidery. This required particular skill in sewing, in order not to strip the metal covering off the thread core. In embroidery, most metal threads are couched, that is, laid on the surface of the fabric and stitched down with fine silk threads.

The complete absence of gold and silver in the dress of the Emperor and his court had particular significance, as seen in this mourning coat of Peter II (1715-1730). The etiquette of mourning allowed only the deepest blacks, of fabrics with no shine – usually wool. No braid, fringe, tassels or embroidery of any kind featured on mourning dress – the absence of all decoration expressing both private and public grief at the death of a monarch or loved one.

Uniform coat of a Russian court chamberlain, Museum no.TK-1647, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Uniform coat of a Russian court chamberlain, Museum no.TK-1647, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Red wool suit worn by Peter II, 1727-1730, Museum no.TK-2911, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Red wool suit worn by Peter II, 1727-1730, Museum no.TK-2911, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Mourning coat of Peter II, 1715-1730, Museum no.TK-2607, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Mourning coat of Peter II, 1715-1730, Museum no.TK-2607, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Hats & boots

The hats in Magnificence of the Tsars fall into different categories, but all of them relate to status and power. The exhibition also features boots worn by court heralds and by emperors, the former being rather fanciful and decorative, the latter more sombre and functional.

Hats

Hats are worn for a variety of reasons. They are worn as protection or decoration for the head. They sometimes indicate the occupation or religious observance of the wearer. The examples in Magnificence of the Tsars fall into different categories, but all of them relate to status and power.

The black ‘tricorne’ or three-cornered hat shown below is one of nine hats surviving from Peter II’s wardrobe. Made of black wool and trimmed round the edge with gilt braid, it probably complemented his Semenovsky Life Guards uniform, a green wool coat and waistcoat decorated with similar braid. Its shape is typical of fashionable Western European hats, of the time and was popular for much of the 18th century.

In contrast, Alexander II’ s helmet, worn at his coronation in1856, is a Russian version of a Prussian (German) helmet called a Pickelhaube. This style of headgear represented the military authority of the new Tsar, and his role as head of the army. It was worn by Russian soldiers during the Crimean War (1854-1856). Made of boiled leather, the skull and peaks functioned as practical protection for the top and back of the head. It is also highly decorative, the metal spike rising from the crown, could have horse hair attached, or, as in this example, a plume. These colourful cock feathers signified the rank of the wearer.

Hat of the Semenovsky Life Guards, 1727–30. Museum no. TK-2755, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums
Hat of the Semenovsky Life Guards, 1727–30. Museum no. TK-2755, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums
Helmet from the Coronation uniform of Alexander II, 1855, Museum no. TK-1558, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums
Helmet from the Coronation uniform of Alexander II, 1855, Museum no. TK-1558, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums
Hat worn by Nicholas II at the Russian Ball of 1903. Fabrique de Chapeaux Bruno Frères, 1903, Museum no.TK-2924, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums
Hat worn by Nicholas II at the Russian Ball of 1903. Fabrique de Chapeaux Bruno Frères, 1903, Museum no.TK-2924, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Even Emperors’ fancy dress might include a hat. The hat that finished off the outfit worn by Tsar Nicholas II at the Russian Ball of 1903 was symbolic of the antiquity of the Romanov dynasty. The whole costume was based on representations of Tsar Alexey Mikhailovich (reigned 1645-1676), who symbolised pre-Westernised Russia. The masquerade hat has a crown of bejewelled cloth of gold trimmed with a deep brim of sable fur. Fur might offer warmth, but this fur was particularly luxurious and expensive, in keeping with the gold and enamelled hat jewels inset with pearls and precious stones in the form of stylised pomegranate flowers. The hat echoes ‘The Cap of Monomakh’ or ‘The Golden Cap’ shown in the portraits of Tsar Alexey and the oldest item kept in the Moscow Armoury collection. Legend suggests that it was a gift to the Russian rulers from the Byzantine emperor Constantine Monomakhos (reigned 1042-1055). It was worn at all coronation rituals from the late 15th to the 17th centuries.

Court servants also wore hats for ceremonies. The heralds’ hats worn at the coronation of Alexander III in 1883 emphasised their ceremonial role during the proceedings. Deliberately harking back to 17th-century Western European dress, the musketeer-style, hat, like all accessories for the herald’s outfit, was designed by an artists employed by the Imperial Theatres. Made of red velvet, it is boldly decorated with ostrich feathers, gold braid and tassels. The fringing on the white kidskin gloves with the monogram of Alexander II matches the hat and a pair of boots.

Postilion’s jacket and cap, cap by Bruno Frères, Fournrs DE S.A.I./Le Grand Duc Héritier A.A. 1881–1917, Museum no.TK-3051, TK-1590, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Postilion’s jacket and cap, cap by Bruno Frères, Fournrs DE S.A.I./Le Grand Duc Héritier A.A. 1881–1917, Museum no.TK-3051, TK-1590, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Like all servants on parade, the postilions who accompanied royal coaches, covered their heads. This black velvet peaked cap matches a jacket of black wool decorated with the same heraldic braid woven with double-headed eagles. The top of its crown is decorated with a button and a gilt fringe, and the band is fastened with a metal buckle. Inside the black silk lining is quilted with wadding and bears the gold dye stamp of the famous St Petersburg hat-making workshop, ‘Bruno frères. Fourners DE S.A.I/Le Grand Duc Heritier A.A.,’ (Bruno brothers, suppliers to their Imperial Majesties, the Grand Duke Heir AA). This business was based at No. 36 Nevsky Prospekt, one of the most important streets for shopping in late 19th- and early 20th-century St Petersburg. French craftsmen were renowned for their skills in the clothing trades across Europe, some taking up residence in Russia.

 

Boots

Boots cover both the foot and lower leg. They have long been used for horseback riding and by the military, as they protect the legs and support the ankles, making it easier for the soldier to march for long distances over difficult ground. They also provide protection from the elements, for example when the ground is covered with snow or mud. European boots evolved from elaborate designs in the 16th and 17th centuries to a variety of simple military styles in the 19th century. Partly as a result of the Napoleonic Wars (1812-14) military boots came into fashion, and were adapted as everyday wear. Magnificence of the Tsars features boots worn by court heralds and by emperors, the former being rather fanciful and decorative, the latter more sombre and functional.

The boots of the Herald of the Order of St Andrew are made from black velvet and embellished with silver braid and rosettes. Their shape and the lacing and crossed braid down the centre front are deliberately historical in style. Similar boots were worn by coronation heralds in the late 18th century. Made in red velvet with red leather heels, they were embroidered with lions’ heads. The lacing up the front and the decorative components were probably modelled on boots worn during the Roman Empire. In both cases, such ornament and style emphasised the importance of the ceremonial role of the herald as the representative and messenger of the Tsar.

Coronation herald’s boots, 1797. Museum no. TK1399/1-2, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Coronation herald’s boots, 1797. Museum no. TK1399/1-2, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Boots worn by the Herald of the Order of St Andrew, Johann Daniel Ermscher, 1797. Museum no. TK-1693/1-2, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Boots worn by the Herald of the Order of St Andrew, Johann Daniel Ermscher, 1797. Museum no. TK-1693/1-2, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

In contrast, the boots of the coronation Herald of 1896 are more substantial, being made from coloured leather, with a goldwork design by E.P. Ponomarev, artist to the Imperial Theatres. The decorative flaps at the front of the foot derive from 17th century fashion. They had a practical purpose when the wearer was on horseback, protecting the front of the foot from the rub of the stirrup. Such boots would have given the wearer the status to escort the coronation procession and were worn with a cloth of gold tabard embroidered with the imperial coat of arms and the red musketeers’ hat.

Unlike the decorative boots worn by the heralds, the boots traditionally worn by the new Tsar at coronations from the end of the 18th century onwards were plain riding boots. These were a standard part of the Preobrazhensky Life Guards regimental uniform. Founded by Peter the Great, the Preobrazhensky was the first regiment of the Russian Imperial Guard, and their colonel was the Tsar himself. These boots, worn by Alexander I at his coronation in 1801, are made of black leather. Such a material is flexible, practical and comfortable. The leather fitted closely at the back of the ankle to hold a metal spur which was used for controlling the horse when riding. Such practical boots were symbolic of the role of the Tsar as a powerful military commander.

Coronation herald’s boots, E. Shtumpf, 1896. Museum no. TK-1632/1-2, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Coronation herald’s boots, E. Shtumpf, 1896. Museum no. TK-1632/1-2, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Coronation uniform of Alexander I, 1801. Museum no. TK-1906/1-2, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Coronation uniform of Alexander I, 1801. Museum no. TK-1906/1-2, © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Interactive Map

Discover the many treasures in the beautiful V&A galleries, find out where events are happening in the Museum or just check the location of the café, shops, lifts or toilets. Simple to use, the V&A interactive map works on all screen sizes, from your tablet or smartphone to your desktop at home.

Launch the Interactive Map