Collection Selection Boxes

Get up close to original prints, drawings and photographs in our collection with our Collection Selection Boxes. Containing carefully curated material that introduces a particular period, style, material, or technique, these resources are available for individual study or group teaching.

Collection Selection Boxes
Collection Selection Boxes. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Location

Opening times

Individuals: Wednesdays, 10.00 – 13.00 and 14.00 – 17.00
Groups (Max 10): Thursdays 10.00 – 13.00 and 14.00 – 17.00

Viewing Collection Selection Boxes is by appointment only. To book an appointment, please email: prints.drawings@vam.ac.uk with a confirmation of the box(es) you would like to view. You can request up to five Collection Selection Boxes in a single visit.

Collection Selection Boxes

Choose your Collection Selection Box from the list below. We will be adding more themed boxes as they become available.

Architecture: The Process of Design

Architecture: The Process of Design

This Collection Selection Box contains a variety of drawings produced by architects at different stages of the design process in order to develop and communicate their ideas. Produced from the 1770s through to the late 1990s, these drawings also demonstrate how architects' approaches to drawing and techniques have evolved over time.

Art Nouveau

Art Nouveau

Two Collection Selection Boxes are available which contain material related to Art Nouveau – the dynamic and expressive style that emerged in the visual arts from the early 1890s to the First World War.

Botanical Illustration

Botanical Illustration

Three Collection Selection Boxes are available which contain material related to botanical illustration in all graphic media and ranging in date from the 15th century to the present day.

Computer Art: Processes and Techniques

Computer Art: Processes and Techniques

Two Collection Selection Boxes are available providing an overview to computer art and the ways in which artists have integrated computer technology in their practice from the 1960s onwards. It spans from the formative period of computer art, up to the 20th century where technology is considered ubiquitous in the production, dissemination and consumption of art and design.

Background image: Collection Selection Boxes. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London